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Social Classes, Inequality and Redistributive Policies in Canada

  • Abdelkrim Araar

The social performance of fiscal redistributive mechanisms in Canada continues to receive a growing interest from politicians and research scientists. The aim of this paper is to assess the evolution of social classes in Canada and to check whether the market and governmental redistribution factors have affected their evolution during the last decade. We focus on the dynamic of inequality, polarization and progressivity of the fiscal system. The results of this study confirm the effectiveness of governmental redistributive mechanism to decrease inequality and polarization significantly and to maintain the middle social class at the detriment of the poorest one. The other evidence concerns the chronic increase in population share and wellbeing of the rich class. Finally, the progressivity of fiscal sytem has registered a significant increase during the last few years.

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Paper provided by CIRPEE in its series Cahiers de recherche with number 0817.

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Date of creation: 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:lvl:lacicr:0817
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  8. Juan Gabriel Rodríguez, 2006. "Measuring Bipolarization, Inequality, Welfare and Poverty," Working Papers 39, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
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  12. James Foster & Michael Wolfson, 2010. "Polarization and the decline of the middle class: Canada and the U.S," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 8(2), pages 247-273, June.
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