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Intangible Assets and Participation in Global Value Chains: An Analysis on a Sample of European Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Cecilia Jona Lasinio

    () (ISTAT)

  • Stefano Manzocchi

    () (LUISS "Guido Carli")

  • Valentina Meliciani

    () (LUISS "Guido Carli")

Abstract

This paper investigates the role of intangible assets as factors influencing participation in global value chains (GVC) in a sample of European economies. We distinguish between different forms of participation in GVC entailing a different degree of capability to create value added domestically and we examine how different intangible assets contribute to foster countries’ engagement in GVC and the reaping of benefits from such participation. The data cover 14 European countries in two broad sectors (manufacturing and total market services) over the period 1995-2014. We find that investing in intangible assets favours participation in GVC and contributes to value appropriation along the chain. Moreover, different intangible assets contribute differently to forward and backward participation.

Suggested Citation

  • Cecilia Jona Lasinio & Stefano Manzocchi & Valentina Meliciani, 2016. "Intangible Assets and Participation in Global Value Chains: An Analysis on a Sample of European Countries," Working Papers LuissLab 16129, Dipartimento di Economia e Finanza, LUISS Guido Carli.
  • Handle: RePEc:lui:lleewp:16129
    as

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    File URL: http://www.luiss.it/RePEc/pdf/lleewp/16129.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Robert Koopman & Zhi Wang & Shang-Jin Wei, 2014. "Tracing Value-Added and Double Counting in Gross Exports," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 104(2), pages 459-494, February.
    2. Carol Corrado & Charles Hulten & Daniel Sichel, 2009. "Intangible Capital And U.S. Economic Growth," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 55(3), pages 661-685, September.
    3. Namchul Shin & Kenneth Kraemer & Jason Dedrick, 2009. "R&D, Value Chain Location and Firm Performance in the Global Electronics Industry," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 315-330.
    4. Mauro Giorgio Marrano & Jonathan Haskel & Gavin Wallis, 2009. "What Happened To The Knowledge Economy? Ict, Intangible Investment, And Britain'S Productivity Record Revisited," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 55(3), pages 686-716, September.
    5. Tsutomu Miyagawa & Shoichi Hisa, 2013. "Estimates Of Intangible Investment By Industry And Productivity Growth In Japan," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 64(1), pages 42-72, March.
    6. Jalava, Jukka & Aulin-Ahmavaara, Pirkko & Alanen, Aku, 2007. "Intangible Capital in the Finnish Business Sector 1975-2005," Discussion Papers 1103, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    7. Jason Dedrick & Kenneth L. Kraemer & Greg Linden, 2010. "Who profits from innovation in global value chains? A study of the iPod and notebook PCs," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(1), pages 81-116, February.
    8. Ram Mudambi, 2008. "Location, control and innovation in knowledge-intensive industries," Journal of Economic Geography, Oxford University Press, vol. 8(5), pages 699-725, September.
    9. Robert Koopman & William Powers & Zhi Wang & Shang-Jin Wei, 2010. "Give Credit Where Credit Is Due: Tracing Value Added in Global Production Chains," NBER Working Papers 16426, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Intangible assets; global value chains; forward and backward participation; R&D expenditure;

    JEL classification:

    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General

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