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The Demand for Enhanced Annuities

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  • Schuhmacher, Petra

Abstract

In enhanced annuities, the annuity payment depends on one's state of health at some contracted date while in "standard annuities", it does not. The focus of this paper is on an annuity market where "standard" and enhanced annuities areoffered simultaneously. When all insured know equally well on their future health status either enhanced annuities drive standard annuities out of the market or vice versa. Both annuity types can exist simultaneously when the insured know varying exactly on their risk type. In the case of the existence of such an "interior" solution, its is derived that this solution must be unique in the case of risk averse insured and that it Pareto-dominates the corner solution. Finally, it is shown that in all cases where at least part of the insured buy enhanced annuities social welfare is reduced.

Suggested Citation

  • Schuhmacher, Petra, 2008. "The Demand for Enhanced Annuities," Discussion Papers in Business Administration 7954, University of Munich, Munich School of Management.
  • Handle: RePEc:lmu:msmdpa:7954
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    File URL: https://epub.ub.uni-muenchen.de/7954/1/The_Demand_for_Enhanced_Annuities_WP.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Brown, Jeffrey R., 2001. "Private pensions, mortality risk, and the decision to annuitize," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 29-62, October.
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    13. Oded Palmon & Avia Spivak, 2007. "Adverse selection and the market for annuities," The Geneva Papers on Risk and Insurance Theory, Springer;International Association for the Study of Insurance Economics (The Geneva Association), vol. 32(1), pages 37-59, June.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    annuitization; health status; enhanced annuities;

    JEL classification:

    • D14 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Saving; Personal Finance
    • D61 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Allocative Efficiency; Cost-Benefit Analysis
    • G11 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Portfolio Choice; Investment Decisions
    • G23 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - Non-bank Financial Institutions; Financial Instruments; Institutional Investors

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