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Supporting the Employment of Mothers: Policy Variation Across Fourteen Welfare States

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  • Marcia Meyers
  • Katherin Ross Phillips
  • Janet Gornick

Abstract

This paper compares fourteen industrialized Western countries--matched to microdata available from LIS--with respect to a subset of public policies that traditionally fall under the umbrella of ""family policy."" The analysis focuses on policies that facilitate the employment of mothers: parental leave, child care, and the scheduling of public education. Data on eighteen measures of public policy are presented and used to construct composite indices of national policy ""packages"" that support employment for mothers with children of different ages.

Suggested Citation

  • Marcia Meyers & Katherin Ross Phillips & Janet Gornick, 1996. "Supporting the Employment of Mothers: Policy Variation Across Fourteen Welfare States," LIS Working papers 139, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
  • Handle: RePEc:lis:liswps:139
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. David C. Ribar, 1992. "Child Care and the Labor Supply of Married Women: Reduced Form Evidence," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 27(1), pages 134-165.
    2. David Blau & Philip Robins, 1991. "Child care demand and labor supply of young mothers over time," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 28(3), pages 333-351, August.
    3. Klerman, Jacob Alex & Leibowitz, Arleen, 1990. "Child Care and Women's Return to Work after Childbirth," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 284-288, May.
    4. Janet Gornick & Katherin Ross Phillips & Marcia Meyers, 1996. "Public Policies and the Employment of Mothers: A Cross-National Study," LIS Working papers 140, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    5. Lee Rainwater & Timothy Smeeding, 1995. "Doing Poorly: The Real Income of American Children in a Comparative Perspective," LIS Working papers 127, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.
    6. Arleen Leibowitz & Jacob Alex Klerman & Linda J. Waite, 1992. "Employment of New Mothers and Child Care Choice: Differences by Children's Age," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 27(1), pages 112-133.
    7. Shirley Dex & Lois B. Shaw, 1986. "British and American Women at Work," Palgrave Macmillan Books, Palgrave Macmillan, number 978-1-349-18267-1, Januario-.
    8. Charles Michalopoulos & Philip K. Robins & Irwin Garfinkel, 1992. "A Structural Model of Labor Supply and Child Care Demand," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 27(1), pages 166-203.
    9. Christopher J. Ruhm & Jackqueline L. Teague, 1995. "Parental Leave Policies in Europe and North America," NBER Working Papers 5065, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mahmud Rice, James & Goodin, Robert E. & Parpo, Antti, 2006. "The Temporal Welfare State: A Crossnational Comparison," Journal of Public Policy, Cambridge University Press, vol. 26(3), pages 195-228, December.
    2. Christina Boll & Elisabeth Bublitz, 2018. "A Cross‐Country Comparison of Gender Differences in Job‐Related Training: The Role of Working Hours and the Household Context," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 56(3), pages 503-555, September.
    3. Steven Pressman, 2009. "Public Policies and the Middle Class throughout the World in the Mid 2000s," LIS Working papers 517, LIS Cross-National Data Center in Luxembourg.

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