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It's About 'Time': Why Time Deficits Matter for Poverty


  • Rania Antonopoulos
  • Thomas Masterson
  • Ajit Zacharias


We cannot adequately assess how much or how little progress we have made in addressing the condition of the most vulnerable in our societies, or provide accurate guidance to policymakers intent on improving each individual’s and household’s ability to reach a basic standard of living, if we do not have a reliable means of measuring who is being left behind. With the support of the United Nations Development Programme and the International Labour Organization, Senior Scholars Rania Antonopoulos and Ajit Zacharias and Research Scholar Thomas Masterson have constructed an alternative measure of poverty that, when applied to the cases of Argentina, Chile, and Mexico, reveals significant blind spots in the official numbers.

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  • Rania Antonopoulos & Thomas Masterson & Ajit Zacharias, 2012. "It's About 'Time': Why Time Deficits Matter for Poverty," Economics Public Policy Brief Archive ppb_126, Levy Economics Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:lev:levppb:ppb_126

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Ajit Zacharias, 2011. "The Measurement of Time and Income Poverty," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_690, Levy Economics Institute.
    2. Thomas Masterson, 2011. "Quality of Match for Statistical Matches Used in the Development of the Levy Institute Measure of Time and Income Poverty (LIMTIP) for Argentina, Chile, and Mexico," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_692, Levy Economics Institute.
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    Cited by:

    1. Prerna Banati & Elena Camilletti & Sarah Cook & UNICEF Office of Research - Innocenti, 2017. "Care Work and Children: An Expert Roundtable," Papers inores884, Innocenti Research Briefs.
    2. Marta Hozer-Koćmiel & Christian Lis, 2016. "Examining Similarities In Time Allocation Amongst European Countries," Statistics in Transition new series, Główny Urząd Statystyczny (Polska), vol. 17(2), pages 317-330, June.
    3. Rania Antonopoulos, 2013. "Expanding Social Protection in Developing Countries: A Gender Perspective," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_757, Levy Economics Institute.
    4. Rania Antonopoulos & Valeria Esquivel & Thomas Masterson & Ajit Zacharias, 2016. "Measuring Poverty in the Case of Buenos Aires: Why Time Deficits Matter," Economics Working Paper Archive wp_865, Levy Economics Institute.
    5. Diksha Arora, 2014. "Gender Differences in Time Poverty in Rural Mozambique," Working Paper Series, Department of Economics, University of Utah 2014_05, University of Utah, Department of Economics.

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