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Demand Analysis with Partially Observed Prices

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  • Ian Crawford

    ()

  • Matthew Polisson

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Abstract

In empirical demand, industrial organization, and labor economics, prices are often unobserved or unobservable since they may only be recorded when an agent transacts. In the absence of any additional information, this partial observability of prices is known to lead to a number of identification problems. However, in this paper, we show that theory-consistent demand analysis remains feasible in the presence of partially observed prices, and hence partially observed implied budget sets, even if we are agnostic about the nature of the missing prices. Our revealed preference approach is empirically meaningful and easy to implement. We illustrate using simple examples.

Suggested Citation

  • Ian Crawford & Matthew Polisson, 2015. "Demand Analysis with Partially Observed Prices," Discussion Papers in Economics 15/12, Division of Economics, School of Business, University of Leicester, revised Dec 2016.
  • Handle: RePEc:lec:leecon:15/12
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    File URL: https://www.le.ac.uk/economics/research/RePEc/lec/leecon/dp15-12.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Stefan Hoderlein & Jörg Stoye, 2014. "Revealed Preferences in a Heterogeneous Population," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 96(2), pages 197-213, May.
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    3. Matthew Polisson & John K.-H. Quah, 2013. "Revealed Preference in a Discrete Consumption Space," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 5(1), pages 28-34, February.
    4. Richard Blundell & Martin Browning & Laurens Cherchye & Ian Crawford & Bram De Rock & Frederic Vermeulen, 2015. "Sharp for SARP: Nonparametric Bounds on Counterfactual Demands," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 7(1), pages 43-60, February.
    5. Stoye, Jörg & Kitamura, Yuichi, 2013. "Nonparametric Analysis of Random Utility Models: Testing," VfS Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 79753, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    6. Browning, Martin, 1989. "A Nonparametric Test of the Life-Cycle Rational Expectations Hypothesis," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 30(4), pages 979-992, November.
    7. Brown, Bryan W & Walker, Mary Beth, 1989. "The Random Utility Hypothesis and Inference in Demand Systems," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 57(4), pages 815-829, July.
    8. Stefan Hoderlein & Jörg Stoye, 2015. "Testing stochastic rationality and predicting stochastic demand: the case of two goods," Economic Theory Bulletin, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 3(2), pages 313-328, October.
    9. P. A. Samuelson, 1947. "Some Implications of "Linearity."," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 15(2), pages 88-90.
    10. Thomas Demuynck & Ewout Verriest, 2013. "I’Ll Never Forget My First Cigarette: A Revealed Preference Analysis Of The “Habits As Durables” Model," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 54(2), pages 717-738, May.
    11. W. E. Diewert, 1973. "Afriat and Revealed Preference Theory," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 40(3), pages 419-425.
    12. Blundell, Richard & Kristensen, Dennis & Matzkin, Rosa, 2014. "Bounding quantile demand functions using revealed preference inequalities," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 179(2), pages 112-127.
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    Cited by:

    1. Thomas Demuynck & Christian Seel, 2018. "Revealed Preference with Limited Consideration," American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 102-131, February.
    2. Matthew Polisson, 2018. "A Lattice Test for Additive Separability," Discussion Paper Series, School of Economics and Finance 201801, School of Economics and Finance, University of St Andrews.
    3. Christopher Dobronyi & Christian Gouri'eroux, 2020. "Consumer Theory with Non-Parametric Taste Uncertainty and Individual Heterogeneity," Papers 2010.13937, arXiv.org, revised Jan 2021.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Demand; missing prices; partial identification; revealed preference;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D11 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Theory
    • D12 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Consumer Economics: Empirical Analysis

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