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The effects of a minimum wage increase in a model with multiple unemployment equilibria

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  • Julie Beugnot

Abstract

We introduce the heterogeneity of labor in a simple imperfectly com- petitive aggregate labor market model "à la Manning (1990)" in order to analyze the effects of an exogenous rise of the legal minimum wage on the unemployment equilibrium, the wage dispersion and the general price level. We assume also the presence of "knowledge spillovers" in the in- dividual production function leading to increasing returns to scale at the aggregate level and involving the possibility of multiple equilibria. Then, thanks to a comparative statics exercise, we show that a rise in the legal minimum wage has no impact on the unemployment equilibria, increases the general price level proportionally to the share of low-skilled employ- ment in the total employment and reduces the wage dispersion. These results are broadly consistent with the Card Krueger's empirical findings (1995).

Suggested Citation

  • Julie Beugnot, 2008. "The effects of a minimum wage increase in a model with multiple unemployment equilibria," Working Papers 08-16, LAMETA, Universtiy of Montpellier, revised Oct 2008.
  • Handle: RePEc:lam:wpaper:08-16
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. Manning, Alan, 1992. "Multiple equilibria in the British labour market : Some empirical evidence," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(7), pages 1333-1365, October.
    3. Cooper,Russell, 1999. "Coordination Games," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521578967.
    4. Ludovic A. Julien & Nicolas Sanz, 2007. "Coûts de transaction, équilibres multiples avec chômage et concurrence monopolistique. Un réexamen du modèle ws-ps," Revue économique, Presses de Sciences-Po, vol. 58(2), pages 311-329.
    5. Blanchard, Olivier Jean & Kiyotaki, Nobuhiro, 1987. "Monopolistic Competition and the Effects of Aggregate Demand," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 77(4), pages 647-666, September.
    6. Dickens, Richard & Machin, Stephen & Manning, Alan, 1999. "The Effects of Minimum Wages on Employment: Theory and Evidence from Britain," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17(1), pages 1-22, January.
    7. Cahuc, P. & Saint-Martin, A. & Zylberberg, A., 2001. "The consequences of the minimum wage when other wages are bargained over," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(2), pages 337-352, February.
    8. Manning, Alan, 1990. "Imperfect Competition, Multiple Equilibria and Unemployment Policy," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 100(400), pages 151-162, Supplemen.
    9. Alan Manning, 1995. "How Do We Know That Real Wages Are Too High?," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 110(4), pages 1111-1125.
    10. Rebitzer, James B. & Taylor, Lowell J., 1995. "The consequences of minimum wage laws Some new theoretical ideas," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 56(2), pages 245-255, February.
    11. Layard, Richard & Nickell, Stephen, 1986. "Unemployment in Britain," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 53(210(S)), pages 121-169, Supplemen.
    12. Oswald, Andrew J, 1982. "The Microeconomic Theory of the Trade Union," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 92(367), pages 576-595, September.
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