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Ranking Economic History Journals: A Citation-Based Impact-Adjusted Analysis

Author

Listed:
  • Gianfranco Di Vaio

    (Faculty of Economics, Libera Università Internazionale delle Scienze Sociali)

  • Jacob Weisdorf

    (Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen)

Abstract

This study ranks - for the first time - 12 international academic journals that have economic history as their main topic. The ranking is based on data collected for the year 2007. Journals are ranked using standard citation analysis where we adjust for age, size and self-citation of journals. We also compare the leading economic history journals with the leading journals in economics in order to measure the influence on economics of economic history, and vice versa. With a few exceptions, our results confirm the general idea about what economic history journals are the most influential for economic history, and that, although economic history is quite independent from economics as a whole, knowledge exchange between the two fields is indeed going on.

Suggested Citation

  • Gianfranco Di Vaio & Jacob Weisdorf, 2009. "Ranking Economic History Journals: A Citation-Based Impact-Adjusted Analysis," Discussion Papers 09-11, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kud:kuiedp:0911
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    File URL: http://www.econ.ku.dk/english/research/publications/wp/dp_2009/0911.pdf/
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rik Pieters & Hans Baumgartner, 2002. "Who Talks to Whom? Intra- and Interdisciplinary Communication of Economics Journals," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(2), pages 483-509, June.
    2. Kodrzycki Yolanda K. & Yu Pingkang, 2006. "New Approaches to Ranking Economics Journals," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 5(1), pages 1-44, August.
    3. Williamson Jeffrey G., 1995. "The Evolution of Global Labor Markets since 1830: Background Evidence and Hypotheses," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 141-196, April.
    4. Williamson, Jeffrey G., 2002. "Land, Labor, And Globalization In The Third World, 1870 1940," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 62(01), pages 55-85, March.
    5. Abramovitz, Moses, 1986. "Catching Up, Forging Ahead, and Falling Behind," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 46(02), pages 385-406, June.
    6. Laband, David N & Piette, Michael J, 1994. "The Relative Impacts of Economics Journals: 1970-1990," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(2), pages 640-666, June.
    7. Liebowitz, S J & Palmer, J P, 1984. "Assessing the Relative Impacts of Economic Journals," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 22(1), pages 77-88, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Klaus Wohlrabe, 2016. "Taking the Temperature: A Meta-Ranking of Economics Journals," CESifo Working Paper Series 5726, CESifo Group Munich.
    2. Frederic S. Lee, 2012. "Heterodox Economics and its Critics," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 24(2), pages 337-351, April.
    3. Johan Fourie & Leigh Gardner, 2014. "The Internationalization of Economic History: A Puzzle," Economic History of Developing Regions, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 29(1), pages 1-14, June.
    4. Bernardo Batiz-Lazo & Rasol Eskandari & John Goddard, 2013. "Online publishing and citation success in the business and economic history of Spain, 1997-2011," Working Papers 13003, Bangor Business School, Prifysgol Bangor University (Cymru / Wales).
    5. Di Vaio, Gianfranco & Waldenström, Daniel & Weisdorf, Jacob, 2012. "Citation success: Evidence from economic history journal publications," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 49(1), pages 92-104.
    6. Baten, Joerg & Julia, Muschallik, 2011. "On the status and the future of economic history in the world," MPRA Paper 34704, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Lutz Bornmann & Alexander Butz & Klaus Wohlrabe, 2018. "What are the top five journals in economics? A new meta-ranking," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(6), pages 659-675, February.
    8. Campanario, Juan Miguel, 2014. "Analysis of the distribution of cited journals according to their positions in the h-core of citing journal listed in Journal Citation Reports," Journal of Informetrics, Elsevier, vol. 8(3), pages 534-545.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic history; journal ranking; citation analysis; scientometrics; impact factor;

    JEL classification:

    • A10 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - General
    • A11 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Role of Economics; Role of Economists
    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • N10 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - General, International, or Comparative

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