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Does Foreign Exchange Intervention Volume Matter?

Author

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  • Rasmus Fatum

    (School of Business, University of Alberta)

  • Yohei Yamamoto

    (Department of Economics, Hitotsubashi University)

Abstract

We investigate whether foreign exchange intervention volume matters for the exchange rate effects of intervention. Our investigation employs daily data on Japanese interventions from April 1991 to April 2012 and time-series estimations, non-temporal threshold analysis, as well as binary choice models. We find that intervention volume matters for the effects of intervention, but only to the extent that the exchange rate effect per intervention unit is magnified in a linear sense by the larger intervention amount. This is a policy-relevant finding that also adds to our understanding of how intervention works.

Suggested Citation

  • Rasmus Fatum & Yohei Yamamoto, 2012. "Does Foreign Exchange Intervention Volume Matter?," EPRU Working Paper Series 2012-03, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kud:epruwp:12-03
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kim, Suk-Joong & Sheen, Jeffrey, 2006. "Interventions in the Yen-dollar spot market: A story of price, volatility and volume," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(11), pages 3191-3214, November.
    2. Neely, Christopher J., 2008. "Central bank authorities' beliefs about foreign exchange intervention," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 1-25, February.
    3. Brett W. Fawley & Luciana Juvenal, 2010. "Japan reenters the foreign exchange market," Economic Synopses, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    4. Chih‐Nan Chen & Tsutomu Watanabe & Tomoyoshi Yabu, 2012. "A New Method for Identifying the Effects of Foreign Exchange Interventions," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 44(8), pages 1507-1533, December.
    5. Michel Beine & Jérôme Lahaye & Sébastien Laurent & Christopher J. Neely & Franz C. Palm, 2007. "Central bank intervention and exchange rate volatility, its continuous and jump components," International Journal of Finance & Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 12(2), pages 201-223.
    6. Christopher J. Neely, 2005. "An analysis of recent studies of the effect of foreign exchange intervention," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Nov, pages 685-718.
    7. Pierre Perron & Yohei Yamamoto, 2015. "Using OLS to Estimate and Test for Structural Changes in Models with Endogenous Regressors," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(1), pages 119-144, January.
    8. Christopher J. Neely, 2011. "A foreign exchange intervention in an era of restraint," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue Sep, pages 303-324.
    9. Michael D. Bordo & Owen F. Humpage & Anna J. Schwartz, 2012. "The Federal Reserve as an Informed Foreign Exchange Trader: 1973–1995," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 8(1), pages 127-160, March.
    10. Ito, Takatoshi & Yabu, Tomoyoshi, 2007. "What prompts Japan to intervene in the Forex market? A new approach to a reaction function," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 193-212, March.
    11. Beine, Michel & Bernal, Oscar, 2007. "Why do central banks intervene secretly?: Preliminary evidence from the BoJ," Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions and Money, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 291-306, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Michal Skorepa & Mojmír Hampl, 2014. "Evolution of the Czech National Bank's holdings of foreign exchange reserves," BIS Papers chapters,in: Bank for International Settlements (ed.), The transmission of unconventional monetary policy to the emerging markets, volume 78, pages 159-169 Bank for International Settlements.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Foreign Exchange Market Intervention; Intervention Volume;

    JEL classification:

    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy
    • F31 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Exchange
    • G14 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Information and Market Efficiency; Event Studies; Insider Trading

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