IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/kof/wpskof/09-243.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

D and Z in ROPE

Author

Listed:
  • Jochen Hartwig

Abstract

The Review of Political Economy (ROPE) welcomed the year 2009 with an issue in which the first two articles use an interesting yet not very popular modeling framework, namely the aggregate demand/aggregate supply (D/Z) model from Chapter 3 of Keynes's General Theory. Unfortunately, as I intend to show in this paper, the interpretations of Keynes's D/Zmodel proposed by these two articles contradict each other. To resolve this unsatisfactory state of affairs, I will offer an evaluation of which of the two interpretations is more in line with Keynes's own suggestions.

Suggested Citation

  • Jochen Hartwig, 2009. "D and Z in ROPE," KOF Working papers 09-243, KOF Swiss Economic Institute, ETH Zurich.
  • Handle: RePEc:kof:wpskof:09-243
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.3929/ethz-a-005995954
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. MG Hayes, 2007. "Keynes's Z function, heterogeneous output and marginal productivity," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 31(5), pages 741-753, September.
    2. M. G. Hayes, 2008. "Keynes's Z function: a reply to Hartwig and Brady," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(5), pages 811-814, September.
    3. Jochen Hartwig, 2004. "Beyond the Market Paradigm: on Keynes's Principle of Effective Demand, and on the Irrelevance of Rigidities for His Explanation of Involuntary Unemployment," History of Economic Ideas, Fabrizio Serra Editore, Pisa - Roma, vol. 12(1), pages 67-94.
    4. John King, 1993. "Aggregate Supply and Demand Analysis Since Keynes: A Partial History," Working Papers 1993.16, School of Economics, La Trobe University.
    5. J. E. King, 1994. "Aggregate Supply and Demand Analysis Since Keynes: A Partial History," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1), pages 3-31, September.
    6. J. Hartwig & M. E. Brady, 2008. "Comment: Hayes on Z," Cambridge Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 32(5), pages 815-819, September.
    7. Palley, Thomas I, 1997. "Expected Aggregate Demand, the Production Period and the Keynesian Theory of Aggregate Supply," The Manchester School of Economic & Social Studies, University of Manchester, vol. 65(3), pages 295-309, June.
    8. Alfonso Palacio-Vera, 2009. "Capital Accumulation, Technical Progress and Labour Supply Growth: Keynes's Approach to Aggregate Supply and Demand Analysis Revisited," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(1), pages 23-49.
    9. Jochen Hartwig, 2006. "Explaining the aggregate price level with Keynes's principle of effective demand," Review of Social Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 64(4), pages 469-492.
    10. Olivier Allain, 2009. "Effective Demand and Short-term Adjustments in the General Theory," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 21(1), pages 1-22.
    11. Jochen Hartwig, 2007. "Keynes vs. the Post Keynesians on the Principle of Effective Demand," The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(4), pages 725-739.
    12. Paul Wells, 1987. "Keynes’s Employment Function and the Marginal Productivity of Labor," Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(4), pages 507-515, July.
    13. David L. Roberts, 1978. "Patinkin, Keynes, and aggregate supply and demand analysis," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 10(4), pages 549-576, Winter.
    14. Victoria Chick, 1983. "Macroeconomics after Keynes: A Reconsideration of the General Theory," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262530457, January.
    15. Jochen Hartwig, 2004. "Keynes's multiplier in a two-sectoral framework," Review of Political Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 16(3), pages 309-334.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Narciso Túñez, 2014. "The Demand for Labour: A Post Keynesian Appraisal," Iberian Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Dpto. Historia e Instituciones Económicas I., vol. 1(2), pages 38-50, January 2.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Keynes's D/Z model; effective demand; Post Keynesianism;

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:kof:wpskof:09-243. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/koethch.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.