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The Geography of Innovation Commercialization in the United States During the 1990s

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  • Joshua L. Rosenbloom

    (Department of Economics, The University of Kansas)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the location and interrelationship of three measures of innovation commercialization across the 50 largest metropolitan areas in the United States and estimates a model of the factors explaining variations in the location of innovation commercialization. In general innovation commercialization tends to be highly geographically concentrated, suggesting the presence of substantial external economies in these functions. Beyond these scale effects, however, I find that the university science and engineering capacity and local patenting activity both help to account for intercity differences in the level of innovation commercialization activity.

Suggested Citation

  • Joshua L. Rosenbloom, 2005. "The Geography of Innovation Commercialization in the United States During the 1990s," WORKING PAPERS SERIES IN THEORETICAL AND APPLIED ECONOMICS 200502, University of Kansas, Department of Economics, revised Jan 2005.
  • Handle: RePEc:kan:wpaper:200502
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    File URL: http://www.ku.edu/~bgju/2005Papers/200502Rosenbloom.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Feldman, Maryann P. & Audretsch, David B., 1999. "Innovation in cities:: Science-based diversity, specialization and localized competition," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 43(2), pages 409-429, February.
    2. Adam B. Jaffe & Manuel Trajtenberg & Rebecca Henderson, 1993. "Geographic Localization of Knowledge Spillovers as Evidenced by Patent Citations," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 108(3), pages 577-598.
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    1. repec:kap:jtecht:v:43:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s10961-017-9580-1 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Richard Shearmur & Nicolas Bonnet, 2011. "Does local technological innovation lead to local development? A policy perspective," Regional Science Policy & Practice, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 3(3), pages 249-270, August.
    3. Jue Wang & Philip Shapira, 2012. "Partnering with universities: a good choice for nanotechnology start-up firms?," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 38(2), pages 197-215, February.

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