IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/jrp/jrpwrp/2018-017.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

GAW survey data linked with administrative data of the IAB (GAW-ADIAB): A documentation and review of empirical evidence and research opportunities

Author

Listed:
  • Michael Wyrwich

    (University of Groningen)

  • Michael Fritsch

    (FSU Jena)

  • Elisabeth Bublitz

    (University of Hamburg)

  • Alina Sorgner

    (John Cabot University Rome)

Abstract

New business formation plays an important role for economic development. Therefore, policy makers put emphasis on fostering start-up activity. Aims and scope of entrepreneurs can be just as heterogeneous as the structure of new ventures. The project "New business formation and the labor market in East and West German growth regimes" within the Collaborative Research Center (SFB 580) "Social developments in post-socialistic societies: discontinuity, tradition, structural formation" at the Friedrich-Schiller University Jena investigated the development and structures of new firms. To this end, the project team conducted the GAW survey by means of computer-assisted telephone interviewing (CATI). In total, there have been 1,105 interviews with founders of firms. The data include personal information on the founder and his or her firm. This information can be merged with administrative data of the Establishment History Panel (BHP = Betriebs-Historik Panel) of the Research Data Centre of the German Institute for Employment Research (IAB). The BHP comprises detailed information on establishment characteristics. Therefore, the GAW survey data provide the unique opportunity to link characteristics of the entrepreneur with detailed information about the characteristics of his or her company and firm growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Wyrwich & Michael Fritsch & Elisabeth Bublitz & Alina Sorgner, 2018. "GAW survey data linked with administrative data of the IAB (GAW-ADIAB): A documentation and review of empirical evidence and research opportunities," Jena Economic Research Papers 2018-017, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
  • Handle: RePEc:jrp:jrpwrp:2018-017
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www2.wiwi.uni-jena.de/Papers/jerp2018/wp_2018_017.pdf
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Elisabeth Bublitz & Michael Fritsch & Michael Wyrwich, 2015. "Balanced Skills and the City: An Analysis of the Relationship between Entrepreneurial Skill Balance, Thickness, and Innovation," Economic Geography, Clark University, vol. 91(4), pages 475-508, October.
    2. Helsley, Robert W. & Strange, William C., 2011. "Entrepreneurs and cities: Complexity, thickness and balance," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(6), pages 550-559.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Tsvetkova, Alexandra, 2016. "Do diversity, creativity and localized competition promote endogenous firm formation? Evidence from a high-tech US industry," MPRA Paper 72349, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Andrea Bonaccorsi & Daniele Biancardi & Mabel Sanchez Barrioluengo & Federico Biagi, 2019. "Study on Higher Education Institutions and Local Development," JRC Working Papers JRC117272, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    3. Javier Changoluisa, 2021. "The early development of new establishments: An evaluation of the role of spatial selection and agglomeration," Jena Economic Research Papers 2021-009, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    4. Alexandra Tsvetkova & Mark Partridge, 2021. "Knowledge-based service economy and firm entry: an alternative to the knowledge spillover theory of entrepreneurship," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 56(2), pages 637-657, February.
    5. Javier Changoluisa & Michael Fritsch, 2020. "New Business Formation and Incumbents’ Perception of Competitive Pressure," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 56(1), pages 165-197, February.
    6. K. Bruns & N. Bosma & M. Sanders & M. Schramm, 2017. "Searching for the existence of entrepreneurial ecosystems: a regional cross-section growth regression approach," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 49(1), pages 31-54, June.
    7. Michael Fritsch & Sandra Kublina, 2015. "Entrepreneurship,Growth, Regional Growth Regimes," Jena Economic Research Papers 2015-002, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    8. Björn Hårsman & Lars-Göran Mattsson & Vardan Hovsepyan, 2018. "The income return to entrepreneurship: theoretical model and outcomes for Swedish regions," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 61(3), pages 479-498, November.
    9. Tsvetkova, Alexandra & Partridge, Mark & Betz, Micael, 2016. "Entrepreneurial and Wage and Salary Employment Response to Economic Conditions Across the Rural-Urban Continuum," MPRA Paper 75781, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Fritsch, Michael & Wyrwich, Michael, 2021. "Is innovation (increasingly) concentrated in large cities? An international comparison," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 50(6).
    11. Zhengyu Cai, 2019. "Hours worked of the self‐employed and agglomeration," Growth and Change, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 50(1), pages 352-380, March.
    12. Elisabeth Bublitz & Michael Fritsch & Michael Wyrwich, 2015. "Balanced Skills and the City: An Analysis of the Relationship between Entrepreneurial Skill Balance, Thickness, and Innovation," Economic Geography, Clark University, vol. 91(4), pages 475-508, October.
    13. Stepan Zemtsov & Vladimir Eremkin & Vera Barinova, 2015. "Factors of Attractiveness of the Leading Russian Universities Overview of Literature and Econometric Analysis of the Leading Universities," Voprosy obrazovaniya / Educational Studies Moscow, National Research University Higher School of Economics, issue 4, pages 201-233.
    14. Dienes, Christian & Schneck, Stefan & Wolter, Hans-Jürgen, 2018. "Die Auswirkungen des Gründungsgeschehens auf das regionale Wirtschaftswachstum," IfM-Materialien 270, Institut für Mittelstandsforschung (IfM) Bonn.
    15. Daniel Lechmann & Claus Schnabel, 2014. "Are the self-employed really jacks-of-all-trades? Testing the assumptions and implications of Lazear’s theory of entrepreneurship with German data," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 42(1), pages 59-76, January.
    16. Elisabeth Bublitz & Kristian Nielsen & Florian Noseleit & Bram Timmermans, 2018. "Entrepreneurship, human capital, and labor demand: a story of signaling and matching," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(2), pages 269-287.
    17. Dohse, Dirk & Vaona, Andrea, 2014. "Start-up complexity and the thickness of regional input markets," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 124(3), pages 424-427.
    18. Alexandra Tsvetkova & Tessa Conroy & Jean-Claude Thill, 2020. "Surviving in a high-tech manufacturing industry: the role of innovative environment and proximity to metropolitan industrial portfolio," International Entrepreneurship and Management Journal, Springer, vol. 16(2), pages 501-527, June.
    19. Hundt Christian & Sternberg Rolf, 2014. "How Did the Economic Crisis Influence New Firm Creation?: A Multilevel Approach Based Upon Data from German Regions," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 234(6), pages 722-756, December.
    20. Glaeser, Edward L. & Rosenthal, Stuart S. & Strange, William C., 2010. "Urban economics and entrepreneurship," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 67(1), pages 1-14, January.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Firm growth; Labour market; Growth; East and West Germany;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship
    • P30 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Institutions and Their Transitions - - - General

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:jrp:jrpwrp:2018-017. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.wiwiss.uni-jena.de/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Markus Pasche (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.wiwiss.uni-jena.de/ .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.