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A Structural Model of The Demand For Telecare

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  • Kevin Momanyi

Abstract

In this paper, we formulate a structural model of the demand for telecare. We show how the Andersen's Behavioral Model of Health Services Use, the Almost Ideal Demand System and the Revealed Preference theory can be combined with microeconomic principles of health production to reason about individuals' utility maximizing behavior. We then estimate the model using a strategy that controls for the effects of both observable and unobservable factors, and later conduct a simulation exercise by way of a decomposition analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Kevin Momanyi, 2018. "A Structural Model of The Demand For Telecare," 2018 Papers pmo1170, Job Market Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:jmp:jm2018:pmo1170
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mathia Sinning & Markus Hahn & Thomas K. Bauer, 2008. "The Blinder–Oaxaca decomposition for nonlinear regression models," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 8(4), pages 480-492, December.
    2. Germano Mwabu, 2009. "The Production of Child Health in Kenya: A Structural Model of Birth Weight," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 18(2), pages 212-260, March.
    3. Olsen, Randall J, 1980. "A Least Squares Correction for Selectivity Bias," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 48(7), pages 1815-1820, November.
    4. Terza, Joseph V. & Basu, Anirban & Rathouz, Paul J., 2008. "Two-stage residual inclusion estimation: Addressing endogeneity in health econometric modeling," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 531-543, May.
    5. Koenker, Roger & Yoon, Jungmo, 2009. "Parametric links for binary choice models: A Fisherian-Bayesian colloquy," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 152(2), pages 120-130, October.
    6. Giles, John & Murtazashvili, Irina, 2010. "A control function approach to estimating dynamic probit models with endogenous regressors, with an application to the study of poverty persistence in China," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5400, The World Bank.
    7. Henderson, Catherine & Knapp, Martin & Fernández, José-Luis & Beecham, Jennifer & Hirani, Shashivadan P. & Beynon, Michelle & Cartwright, Martin & Rixon, Lorna & Doll, Helen & Bower, Peter & Steventon, 2014. "Cost-effectiveness of telecare for people with social care needs: the Whole Systems Demonstrator cluster randomised trial," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 57270, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    8. Deaton, Angus S & Muellbauer, John, 1980. "An Almost Ideal Demand System," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(3), pages 312-326, June.
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    Blog mentions

    As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
    1. Thesis Thursday: Kevin Momanyi
      by Chris Sampson in The Academic Health Economists' Blog on 2019-05-16 06:00:19

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • C36 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Instrumental Variables (IV) Estimation
    • C55 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Large Data Sets: Modeling and Analysis
    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation

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