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What's Best for Women: Gender Based Taxation, Wage Subsidies or Basic Income?

  • Colombino, Ugo

    ()

    (University of Turin)

  • Narazani, Edlira

    ()

    (University of Turin)

We use a microeconometric model of household labour supply in order to evaluate, with Italian data, the behavioural and welfare effects of gender based taxation (GBT) as compared to other policies based on different optimal taxation principles. The comparison is interesting because GBT, although technically correct, might face implementation difficulties not shared by other policies that in turn might produce comparable benefits. The simulation procedure accounts for the constraints implied by fiscal neutrality and market equilibrium. Our results support to some extent the expectations of GBT's proponents. However it is not an unquestionable success. GBT induces a modest increase of women's employment, but similar effects can be attained by universal subsidies on low wages. When the policies are evaluated in terms of welfare, GBT ranks first among single women but for the whole population the best policies are subsidies on low wages, unconditional transfers or a combination of the two.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 6828.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: Aug 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6828
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  1. Colombino Ugo, 2012. "Equilibrium simulation with microeconometric models. A new procedure with an application to income support policies," Department of Economics and Statistics Cognetti de Martiis. Working Papers 201209, University of Turin.
  2. Rolf Aaberge & Ugo Colombino, 2011. "Empirical Optimal Income Taxation: A Microeconometric Application to Norway," CHILD Working Papers wp16_11, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
  3. repec:dgr:kubcen:2012041 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. Aaberge, Rolf & Colombino, Ugo & Strøm, Steinar, 2003. "Do More Equal Slices Shrink the Cake? An Empirical Investigation of Tax-Transfer Reform Proposals in Italy," Memorandum 37/2003, Oslo University, Department of Economics.
  5. Peter A. Diamond & Emmanuel Saez, 2011. "The Case for a Progressive Tax: From Basic Research to Policy Recommendations," CESifo Working Paper Series 3548, CESifo Group Munich.
  6. Aaberge, Rolf & Colombino, Ugo & Strom, Steinar, 1999. "Labour Supply in Italy: An Empirical Analysis of Joint Household Decisions, with Taxes and Quantity Constraints," Journal of Applied Econometrics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(4), pages 403-22, July-Aug..
  7. Alberto Alesina & Andrea Ichino & Loukas Karabarbounis, 2007. "Gender Based Taxation and the Division of Family Chores," NBER Working Papers 13638, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Richard Blundell & Andrew Shephard, 2012. "Employment, Hours of Work and the Optimal Taxation of Low-Income Families," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 79(2), pages 481-510.
  9. John Creedy & Alan Duncan, 2001. "Aggregating labour supply and feedback effects in microsimulation," IFS Working Papers W01/24, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  10. Rolf Aaberge, 2007. "Gini’s nuclear family," Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer, vol. 5(3), pages 305-322, December.
  11. Laurens Cherchye & Bram De Rock & Arthur Lewbel & Frederic Vermeulen, 2012. "Sharing Rule Identification for General Collective Consumption Models," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 809, Boston College Department of Economics, revised 01 Jul 2013.
  12. Ugo Colombino & Marilena Locatelli & Edlira Narazani & Cathal O’Donoghue, 2010. "Alternative Basic Income Mechanisms: An Evaluation Exercise with a Microeconometric Model," CHILD Working Papers wp04_10, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
  13. De Vincenti Claudio & Paladini Ruggero, 2009. "Personal Income Tax Design for Italy: Lessons from the Theory," Rivista italiana degli economisti, Società editrice il Mulino, issue 1, pages 7-46.
  14. repec:rie:review:v:14:y:2009:i:1:n:1 is not listed on IDEAS
  15. Massimo Baldini & Stefano Toso & Paolo Bosi, 2002. "Targeting welfare in Italy: old problems and perspectives on reform," Fiscal Studies, Institute for Fiscal Studies, vol. 23(1), pages 51-75, March.
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