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Does Public Information about School Quality Lead to Flight from Low-Achieving Schools?

Author

Listed:
  • Friesen, Jane

    () (Simon Fraser University)

  • Javdani, Mohsen

    () (University of British Columbia, Okanagan)

  • Woodcock, Simon D.

    () (Simon Fraser University)

Abstract

We estimate the effect of publicly disseminated information about school-level achievement on students' mobility between elementary schools. We find that students are more likely to leave their school when poor school-level performance is revealed. In general, parents respond to information soon after it becomes available. Once the information is absorbed, they do not respond to subsequent releases, even when it is reframed and given widespread media attention. Parents in low-income neighborhoods and those who speak a non-English language at home respond most strongly. However, non-English speaking parents only respond when information is widely disseminated and discussed in the media.

Suggested Citation

  • Friesen, Jane & Javdani, Mohsen & Woodcock, Simon D., 2009. "Does Public Information about School Quality Lead to Flight from Low-Achieving Schools?," IZA Discussion Papers 4632, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp4632
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Downes, Thomas A. & Zabel, Jeffrey E., 2002. "The impact of school characteristics on house prices: Chicago 1987-1991," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(1), pages 1-25, July.
    2. David Dranove & Daniel Kessler & Mark McClellan & Mark Satterthwaite, 2003. "Is More Information Better? The Effects of "Report Cards" on Health Care Providers," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 111(3), pages 555-588, June.
    3. Leemore Dafny & David Dranove, 2008. "Do report cards tell consumers anything they don't already know? The case of Medicare HMOs," RAND Journal of Economics, RAND Corporation, vol. 39(3), pages 790-821, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Friesen, Jane & Harris, Benjamin Cerf & Woodcock, Simon, 2013. "Open Enrolment and Student Achievement," CLSSRN working papers clsrn_admin-2013-46, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 22 Mar 2014.
    2. Zhai, Fuhua & Raver, C. Cybele & Jones, Stephanie M., 2012. "Academic performance of subsequent schools and impacts of early interventions: Evidence from a randomized controlled trial in Head Start settings," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 946-954.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    information; school choice;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education

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