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The Big Carrot: High Stake Incentives Revisited

Author

Listed:
  • Brañas-Garza, Pablo

    () (Middlesex University Business School, London)

  • García-Muñoz, Teresa

    () (Universidad de Granada)

  • Neuman, Shoshana

    () (Bar-Ilan University)

Abstract

This paper provides an empirical demonstration of high stakes incentives in relation to religious practice. It shows that, when both positive (carrot) and negative (stick) incentives are available, the former are more effective than the latter. Specifically, it is shown that beliefs in heaven are much more relevant than beliefs in hell when estimating the production of religious commodities (church-attendance and praying equations).

Suggested Citation

  • Brañas-Garza, Pablo & García-Muñoz, Teresa & Neuman, Shoshana, 2008. "The Big Carrot: High Stake Incentives Revisited," IZA Discussion Papers 3287, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3287
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Pablo BraÒas-Garza & Shoshana Neuman, 2004. "Analyzing Religiosity within an Economic Framework: The Case of Spanish Catholics," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 2(1), pages 5-22, March.
    2. Nikiforakis, Nikos, 2008. "Punishment and counter-punishment in public good games: Can we really govern ourselves," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 91-112.
    3. Robert J. Barro & Rachel McCleary, 2003. "Religion and Economic Growth," NBER Working Papers 9682, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Derek Pyne, 2008. "A Model of Religion and Death," Papers on Economics of Religion 08/06, Department of Economic Theory and Economic History of the University of Granada..
    2. Pyne, Derek Arnold, 2010. "A model of religion and death," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 46-54, January.
    3. Jaime Ortiz, 2009. "Does Religion Distribution Matter in the Economic Growth of Latin America?," International Journal of Business and Economics, College of Business and College of Finance, Feng Chia University, Taichung, Taiwan, vol. 8(3), pages 183-199, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    rewards; economics of religion; carrot/stick; punishment; high stakes;

    JEL classification:

    • C91 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Laboratory, Individual Behavior
    • D64 - Microeconomics - - Welfare Economics - - - Altruism; Philanthropy; Intergenerational Transfers
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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