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Young People’s Attitudes towards Muslims in Sweden

Author

Listed:
  • Bevelander, Pieter

    (Malmö University)

  • Otterbeck, Jonas

    (Malmö University)

Abstract

Since the 1950’s, the Muslim population in Sweden has grown from just a few individuals to approximately 350,000 of which one third is of school age or younger. With the use of multiple regression technique, the principal objective of this study has been to clarify and examine young people’s attitudes towards Muslims, and the relationships between these attitudes and a large number of background factors. The material employed in the analysis comprises a representative sample of 9,498 non-Muslim youths (4,680 girls and 4,818 boys) between 15–19 years of age. The main results of the study show that when controlling for several background variables simultaneously, many variables affect the attitude towards Muslims. The country of birth, socio-economic background and school/program factors are found to have an effect on the attitude towards Muslims. Moreover, especially socio-psychological factors, the relationship to friends and the perceptions of gender role patterns are found to be important. In addition, local/regional factors like high levels of unemployment, high shares of immigrants in a local environment also have an effect on the attitude towards Muslims. No differences in the attitude of boys and girls were measured. The article gives some support for the contact hypothesis and hypotheses on different kinds of social dominance. Finally, the influence of negative discourses on Islam and Muslims are discussed.

Suggested Citation

  • Bevelander, Pieter & Otterbeck, Jonas, 2007. "Young People’s Attitudes towards Muslims in Sweden," IZA Discussion Papers 2977, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp2977
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    File URL: https://docs.iza.org/dp2977.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Carlsson, Magnus & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2007. "Evidence of ethnic discrimination in the Swedish labor market using experimental data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 716-729, August.
    2. Christian Dustmann & Francesca Fabbri & Ian Preston, 2011. "Racial Harassment, Ethnic Concentration, and Economic Conditions," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 113(3), pages 689-711, September.
    3. Bevelander, Pieter & Lundh, Christer, 2007. "Employment Integration of Refugees: The Influence of Local Factors on Refugee Job Opportunities in Sweden," IZA Discussion Papers 2551, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Bevelander, Pieter & Hjerm, Mikael & Kiiskinen, Jenny, 2013. "The Religious Affiliation and Anti-Semitism of Secondary School Swedish Youths: A Statistical Analysis of Survey Data from 2003 and 2009," IZA Discussion Papers 7218, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Fleischmann, Fenella & Phalet, Karen, 2010. "Identity multiplicity among the Muslim second generation in European cities: Where are religious and ethnic identities compatible or conflicting with civic identities?," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Migration, Integration, Transnationalization SP IV 2010-705, WZB Berlin Social Science Center.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    religion; Muslims; young people; attitudes;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Z12 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Religion
    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration

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