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What Is Behind Stagnant Unemployment in Ukraine: The Role of the Informal Sector

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  • Kupets, Olga

    (Kyiv School of Economics)

Abstract

In recent years there has been much policy discussion of the impact of unemployment benefits and other factors on unemployment duration in developed and transition countries. This paper presents first evidence on the determinants of unemployment duration in Ukraine. Using individual-level data from the first wave of the Ukrainian Longitudinal Monitoring Survey (ULMS -2003), which cover the period 1997-2003, we find no significant effect of benefit receipt on exits from unemployment. However, our survival analysis confirms the hypothesis that income from casual activities or subsidiary farming has strong disincentive effect on the hazard of re-employment in Ukraine. The results also indicate that individual's age, marital status and gender, the level of education and place of residence are significantly related to the total time spent out of work. The estimates of the baseline hazard parameters do not suggest any marked negative duration dependence.

Suggested Citation

  • Kupets, Olga, 2005. "What Is Behind Stagnant Unemployment in Ukraine: The Role of the Informal Sector," IZA Discussion Papers 1738, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1738
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Machin, Stephen & Manning, Alan, 1999. "The causes and consequences of longterm unemployment in Europe," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 47, pages 3085-3139, Elsevier.
    2. Wiji Narendranathan & Mark B. Stewart, 1993. "Modelling the Probability of Leaving Unemployment: Competing Risks Models with Flexible Base‐Line Hazards," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series C, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 42(1), pages 63-83, March.
    3. Kupets, Olga, 2006. "Determinants of unemployment duration in Ukraine," Journal of Comparative Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(2), pages 228-247, June.
    4. Mortensen, Dale T. & Pissarides, Christopher A., 1999. "New developments in models of search in the labor market," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 39, pages 2567-2627, Elsevier.
    5. Gillian Paull, 2002. "Biases in the reporting of labour market dynamics," IFS Working Papers W02/10, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    6. Lehmann, Hartmut & Wadsworth, Jonathan & Acquisti, Alessandro, 1999. "Grime and Punishment: Insecurity and Wage Arrears in the Russian Federation," IZA Discussion Papers 65, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Bilyk Olga & Sheron Iuliia, 2012. "Do informal networks matter in the Ukrainian labor market?," EERC Working Paper Series 12/11e, EERC Research Network, Russia and CIS.
    2. Fenglian Du & Jian-chun Yang & Xiao-yuan Dong, 2007. "Why Do Women Have Longer Unemployment Durations than Men in Post-Restructuring Urban China?," Working Papers PMMA 2007-23, PEP-PMMA.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    transition countries; casual work; unemployment duration; semiparametric duration analysis;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • J68 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Public Policy
    • P23 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Factor and Product Markets; Industry Studies; Population

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