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The Effects of the Minimum Wage on Wages, Employment and Prices

  • Lemos, Sara


    (University of Leicester)

This paper puts together evidence for the wages, employment and price effects of the minimum wage. This overall picture will help to understand the small employment effects prevalent in the literature in the light of price effects. The data used is an under-explored monthly Brazilian household survey from 1982 to 2000, similar to the US CPS. As the international literature on the minimum wage is scanty on non-US empirical evidence, in particular on developing countries, this paper will also help to extend the current understanding on the effects of the minimum wage in developing countries. This is crucial if the minimum wage is to be used as a policy to help poor people in poor countries.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 1135.

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Length: 11 pages
Date of creation: May 2004
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Research in Labor Economics, 2007, 26, 397-413
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp1135
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References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

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  1. Sara lemos, 2004. "Political Variables as Instruments for the Minimum Wage," Discussion Papers in Economics 04/11, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  2. repec:oup:restud:v:58:y:1991:i:2:p:277-97 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. Richard Dickens & Stephen Machin & Alan Manning, 1994. "The Effects of Minimum Wages on Employment: Theory and Evidence from Britain," CEP Discussion Papers dp0183, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  4. Sara lemos, 2004. "The Effects of the Minimum Wage in the Private and Public Sectors in Brazil," Discussion Papers in Economics 04/12, Department of Economics, University of Leicester.
  5. Brown, Charles, 1999. "Minimum wages, employment, and the distribution of income," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 32, pages 2101-2163 Elsevier.
  6. Pablo Fajnzylber, 2001. "Minimum Wage Effects Throughout the Wage Distribution: Evidence from Brazil's Formal and Informal Sectors," Anais do XXIX Encontro Nacional de Economia [Proceedings of the 29th Brazilian Economics Meeting] 098, ANPEC - Associação Nacional dos Centros de Pósgraduação em Economia [Brazilian Association of Graduate Programs in Economics].
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