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Information, Belief Elicitation and Threshold Effects in the 5X1000 Tax Scheme: A Framed Field Experiment

Listed author(s):
  • Becchetti, Leonardo

    ()

    (University of Rome Tor Vergata)

  • Pelligra, Vittorio

    ()

    (University of Cagliari)

  • Reggiani, Tommaso

    ()

    (Libera Università Maria Ss. Assunta Palermo)

In this paper we study by means of a framed field experiment on a representative sample of the population the effect on people's charitable giving of three, substantial and procedural, elements: information provision, belief elicitation and threshold on distribution. We frame this investigation within the 5X1000 tax scheme, a mechanism through which Italian taxpayers may choose to give a small proportion (0.5%) of their income tax to a voluntary organization to fund its activities. We find two main results: a social information effect, since information on total donations received by the organizations in the previous year significantly increases the share of donors, and a distributional effect, leading, the information provision, to a significant increase in the share of donors to the organization reporting the lowest aggregate donations.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 10710.

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Length: 45 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2017
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10710
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