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Determinants of Japanese Aid Allocation: An Econometric Analysis

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Abstract

Economic self-interest and politico-strategic and humanitarian concerns motivate donor countries in their development assistance policies. A large amount of literature has pointed out that either economic self-interest or political self-interest played a pivotal role in the early phases of foreign aid programmes of many donors. Currently, almost all donors include humanitarian assistance in explaining their aid motives. We investigate how Japanese aid allocation policies have changed over the time and also identify empirically the major determinants of aid allocation. It is found from the empirical evidence that Japan takes national interest as well as recipient country needs into account in allocating their aid. The nature of Asian biasness in Japanese aid may continue given the high emphasis on national economic and security interests. Given the historical trend one can conclude that the same determinant factors may keep on playing vital roles in aid allocation decision-making at least for some years to come even though there has been an increased call for more assistance to poor regions.

Suggested Citation

  • Nawalage S. Cooray, 2004. "Determinants of Japanese Aid Allocation: An Econometric Analysis," Working Papers EMS_2004_03, Research Institute, International University of Japan.
  • Handle: RePEc:iuj:wpaper:ems_2004_03
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    File URL: http://www.iuj.ac.jp/workingpapers/index.cfm?File=EMS_2004_03.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2004
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alesina, Alberto & Dollar, David, 2000. "Who Gives Foreign Aid to Whom and Why?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 5(1), pages 33-63, March.
    2. Berthelemy, Jean-Claude & Tichit, Ariane, 2004. "Bilateral donors' aid allocation decisions--a three-dimensional panel analysis," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 13(3), pages 253-274.
    3. Gounder, Rukmani, 1994. "Empirical results of aid motivations: Australia's bilateral aid program," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 99-113, January.
    4. B. Mak Arvin & Torben Drewes, 2001. "Are there biases in German bilateral aid allocations," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(3), pages 173-177.
    5. Maizels, Alfred & Nissanke, Machiko K., 1984. "Motivations for aid to developing countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 12(9), pages 879-900, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Wako, Hassen, 2016. "Aid, institutions and economic growth: Heterogeneous parameters and heterogeneous donors," MERIT Working Papers 009, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
    2. Wako, Hassen, 2011. "Effectiveness of foreign aid in sub-Saharan Africa: Does disaggregating aid into bilateral and multilateral components make a difference?," MPRA Paper 72617, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Japanese ODA policy; determinants of Japanese aid allocation; cross-sectional analysis; donor interest; recipient need;

    JEL classification:

    • F35 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - Foreign Aid
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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