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Imposed Efficiency of Treaty Port: Japanese Industrialization and Western Imperialist Institutions

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  • NAKABAYASHI, Masaki

    () (Institute of Social Science, The University of Tokyo)

Abstract

An intrinsic feature of a pre-modern society is in its fragmentary markets. Fragmentary markets are more likely to fail in the coordination of resource allocation. However, if a concentrated market is exogenously formed and the market could provide the only price to local markets, the market can work as a pivot of coordination for development. Treaty port markets imposed on nineteenth-century Japan worked as the pivot and ignited Japan's industrialization. We examine the silk-reeling industry, which was the major export industry and which led to Japanese industrialization, and the role of treaty ports in its development.

Suggested Citation

  • NAKABAYASHI, Masaki, 2008. "Imposed Efficiency of Treaty Port: Japanese Industrialization and Western Imperialist Institutions," ISS Discussion Paper Series (series F) f142, Institute of Social Science, The University of Tokyo, revised 15 Jun 2012.
  • Handle: RePEc:itk:issdps:f142 Note: Data are included.
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    File URL: http://www.iss.u-tokyo.ac.jp/publishments/dpf/pdf/f-142.pdf
    File Function: Revised version, November. 2013
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Mathias Hoffmann & Toshihiro Okubo, 2012. "'By a Silken Thread': regional banking integration and pathways to financial development in Japan's Great Recession," ECON - Working Papers 102, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    international trade; institutions; economic openness; treaty port; empire effect;

    JEL classification:

    • O19 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations
    • F14 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Empirical Studies of Trade
    • N75 - Economic History - - Economic History: Transport, International and Domestic Trade, Energy, and Other Services - - - Asia including Middle East

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