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Technology and non-technology shocks in a two-sector economy

Author

Listed:
  • Francesco Busato

    (University of Naples Parthenope and University of Aarhus, School of Economics and Managements)

  • Alessandro Girardi

    (ISAE - Institute for Studies and Economic Analyses and University of Rome Tor Vergata)

  • Amedeo Argentiero

    (University of Rome Tor Vergata)

Abstract

This paper presents an empirically testable two-sector dynamic general equilibrium model for the United States economy that admits technology and non-technology shocks. Long-run identification restrictions further distinguish the impact of each shocks over the originating sector (i.e. as a sector-specific shock), and over other sectors different from the originating one (i.e. as a crosssector shock), also exploring the shocks transmission mechanism across sectors. There are three main results. First, business cycles are mainly generated, in each sector, by technology shocks (primarily described by sector-specific shocks), but they are transmitted across sectors along the sectors’ demand side, i.e. passing through non-technology shocks. Second, technology and nontechnology shocks almost equally share the responsibility of fluctuations in the aggregate manufacturing sector. Third, the aggregate dynamics is driven by the relatively larger sector which is the non-durable good one.

Suggested Citation

  • Francesco Busato & Alessandro Girardi & Amedeo Argentiero, 2008. "Technology and non-technology shocks in a two-sector economy," ISAE Working Papers 96, ISTAT - Italian National Institute of Statistics - (Rome, ITALY).
  • Handle: RePEc:isa:wpaper:96
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Cited by:

    1. Caporale, Guglielmo Maria & Ciferri, Davide & Girardi, Alessandro, 2011. "Fiscal shocks and real exchange rate dynamics: Some evidence for Latin America," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 709-723, September.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Long-run restrictions; sector-specific shocks; cross sector shocks; real business cycle; United States economy.;

    JEL classification:

    • E2 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment
    • E3 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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