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On The Role of Technology Shocks as a Source of Business Cycles: Some New Evidence

Author

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  • Jordi Galí

    (CREI and Universitat Pompeu Fabra,)

Abstract

I provide some new evidence that reinforces the conclusion in Galí (1999) that exogenous variations in technology play a very limited role, if any, as sources of the business cycle. First, I provide evidence that supports the identification of technology shocks proposed in that paper. Second, I show that similar findings obtain when the same approach is implemented for the Euro area, using a newly available data set. (JEL: E32, E24) Copyright (c) 2004 The European Economic Association.

Suggested Citation

  • Jordi Galí, 2004. "On The Role of Technology Shocks as a Source of Business Cycles: Some New Evidence," Journal of the European Economic Association, MIT Press, vol. 2(2-3), pages 372-380, 04/05.
  • Handle: RePEc:tpr:jeurec:v:2:y:2004:i:2-3:p:372-380
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Alho, Kari O.E. & Nikula, Nuutti, 2006. "Productivity, Empoyment and Taxes - Evidence on the Potential Trade-offs and Impacts in the EU," Discussion Papers 1054, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    2. Garth Heutel, 2012. "How Should Environmental Policy Respond to Business Cycles? Optimal Policy under Persistent Productivity Shocks," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(2), pages 244-264, April.
    3. Matteo Iacoviello, 2005. "House Prices, Borrowing Constraints, and Monetary Policy in the Business Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(3), pages 739-764, June.
    4. Tervala, Juha, 2007. "Technology Shocks and Employment in Open Economies," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 1, pages 1-27.
    5. M.S.Rafiq, 2006. "Great Ratios, Balanced Growth and Stochastic Trends: Evidence for the Euro Area," Discussion Paper Series 2006_20, Department of Economics, Loughborough University.
    6. Cúrdia, Vasco & Finocchiaro, Daria, 2013. "Monetary regime change and business cycles," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 756-773.
    7. M.S.Rafiq, 2006. "Business Cycle Moderation - Good Policies or Good Luck: Evidence and Explanations for the Euro Area," Discussion Paper Series 2006_21, Department of Economics, Loughborough University.
    8. Dupaigne, Martial & Fève, Patrick & Matheron, Julien, 2005. "Technology Shocks and Employment: Do We Really Need DSGE Models with a Fall in Hours?," IDEI Working Papers 349, Institut d'Économie Industrielle (IDEI), Toulouse.
    9. Garth Heutel, 2012. "How Should Environmental Policy Respond to Business Cycles? Optimal Policy under Persistent Productivity Shocks," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(2), pages 244-264, April.
    10. Helge Braun & Reinout De Bock & Riccardo DiCecio, 2009. "Supply shocks, demand shocks, and labor market fluctuations," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, issue May, pages 155-178.
    11. Martial Dupaigne & Patrick Feve & Julien Matheron, 2007. "Technology Shocks, Non-stationary Hours and DSVAR," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 10(2), pages 238-255, April.
    12. Rossi, Lorenza & Mattesini, Fabrizio, 2007. "Productivity Shock and Optimal Monetary Policy in a Unionized Labor Market. Forthcoming: The Manchester School," MPRA Paper 8414, University Library of Munich, Germany, revised 2008.
    13. Kim, Sangho & Lim, Hyunjoon & Park, Donghyun, 2010. "Productivity and Employment in a Developing Country: Some Evidence from Korea," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 514-522, April.
    14. Silvia Sgherri, 2005. "Long-Run Productivity Shifts and Cyclical Fluctuations; Evidence for Italy," IMF Working Papers 05/228, International Monetary Fund.
    15. Francesco Busato & Alessandro Girardi & Amadeo Argentiero, 2005. "Technology and non-technology shocks in a two-sector economy," Economics Working Papers 2005-11, Department of Economics and Business Economics, Aarhus University.
    16. Cakici, S. Meral, 2011. "Financial integration and business cycles in a small open economy," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(7), pages 1280-1302.
    17. Wen, Yi, 2007. "By force of demand: Explaining international comovements," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 1-23, January.
    18. Andrei Polbin & Sergey Drobyshevsky, 2014. "Developing a Dynamic Stochastic Model of General Equilibrium for the Russian Economy," Research Paper Series, Gaidar Institute for Economic Policy, issue 166P, pages 156-156.
    19. Tripier, Fabien, 2006. "Sticky prices, fair wages, and the co-movements of unemployment and labor productivity growth," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 30(12), pages 2749-2774, December.
    20. Tervala, Juha, 2007. "Technology Shocks and Employment in Open Economies," Economics - The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW), vol. 1, pages 1-27.
    21. Alho, Kari & Nikula, Nuutti, 2007. "Productivity, Employment and Taxes - A SVAR Analysis of Trade-offs and Impacts," Discussion Papers 1074, The Research Institute of the Finnish Economy.
    22. Cakici, S. Meral, 2012. "Technology shocks under varying degrees of financial openness," International Review of Economics & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 232-245.
    23. Francesco Giuli & Massimiliano Tancioni, 2009. "Firm-Specific Capital, Productivity Shocks and Investment Dynamics," Working Papers 120, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity

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