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Growth and Recovery in Mongolia During Transition

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  • Mr. Kevin C Cheng

Abstract

This paper studies Mongolia's experience of growth and recovery during the first decade of its transition to a market-based system and compares it with those of other transition economies. Mongolia, like most other transition economies, experienced a painful, initial "transformational recession" before the economy began to recover, with efficiency gains the main source of growth during the early stages of transition. Mongolia's transition process has been relatively smooth compared with other transition economies, probably reflecting the combined effects of some favorable initial conditions, coupled with the early adoption of appropriate adjustment policies and market-oriented reforms.

Suggested Citation

  • Mr. Kevin C Cheng, 2003. "Growth and Recovery in Mongolia During Transition," IMF Working Papers 2003/217, International Monetary Fund.
  • Handle: RePEc:imf:imfwpa:2003/217
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Simeon Djankov & Peter Murrell, 2002. "Enterprise Restructuring in Transition: A Quantitative Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 40(3), pages 739-792, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. Mr. Sanjeev Gupta & Mr. Alejandro Simone & Mr. Alex Segura-Ubiergo, 2006. "New Evidence on Fiscal Adjustment and Growth in Transition Economies," IMF Working Papers 2006/244, International Monetary Fund.
    2. World Bank, . "Mongolia Economic Update, July 2018," World Bank Other Operational Studies, The World Bank, number 30103, March.
    3. Enkh-Amgalan BYAMBAJAV & Terukazu SURUGA, 2009. "Regional Convergence and Migration: The Case of Mongolia 1989-2004," GSICS Working Paper Series 21, Graduate School of International Cooperation Studies, Kobe University.

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