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Comparative Politics and Public Finance

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  • Torsten Persson
  • Gerard Roland
  • Guido Tabellini

Abstract

We present a model of electoral accountability to compare the public finance outcomes under a presidential-congressional and a parliamentary system. In a presidential-congressional system, contrary to a parliamentary system, there are no endogenous incentives for legislative cohesion, but this allows for a clearer separation of powers. These features lead to clear differences in the public finance performance of the two systems. A Parliamentary system has redistribution towards a majority, less underprovision of public goods, more waste and a higher burden of taxation, whereas a presidential-congressional system has redistribution towards a minority, more underprovision of public goods, but less waste and a smaller size of government.

Suggested Citation

  • Torsten Persson & Gerard Roland & Guido Tabellini, "undated". "Comparative Politics and Public Finance," Working Papers 114, IGIER (Innocenzo Gasparini Institute for Economic Research), Bocconi University.
  • Handle: RePEc:igi:igierp:114
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Torsten Persson & Gerard Roland & Guido Tabellini, 1997. "Separation of Powers and Political Accountability," CESifo Working Paper Series 136, CESifo.
    2. Baron, David P. & Ferejohn, John A., 1989. "Bargaining in Legislatures," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 83(4), pages 1181-1206, December.
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    • H00 - Public Economics - - General - - - General

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