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Migrant women labor-force participation in Germany : Human capital, segmented labor market, and gender perspectives

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  • Knize Estrada, Veronika J.

    (Institute for Employment Research (IAB), Nuremberg, Germany ; FAU)

Abstract

"This paper analyzes individual, structural, and cultural factors that influence the labor-force participation of migrant women in Germany. Considering the well-established evidence that immigrant women work less than natives, with statuses and earnings differing significantly between them, I investigate the economic activity of the former by examining the cross-sectional data from the IAB-SOEP Migration Sample 2013 with multiple linear regression techniques. This evaluation is supported by three approaches which offer explanations for their employment behavior: human capital theory, segmented labor market theory, and the less examined in German research cultural hypothesis. Migrant women's employment status is, in principle, one's decision as member of a household; nevertheless, it is embedded in cross-national cultural processes and also constrained by structures; e.g., by employers and institutions. The analysis shows that classic human capital elements appear to be less reliable predictors of women's labor supply: higher education attained abroad is only marginally related to women participating in the workforce. The Middle-Eastern and North African origin, the Muslim religion, and higher levels of religiosity are negatively associated to women's labor participation reflecting a traditional gendered work division. This effect is minimized when controlling for German education, however. I argue that the lower labor-force participation among migrant women is partially explained by the fact that immigrants are on average less educated and more traditional than natives, having skills that are only restrictively transferable into the German labor market." (Author's abstract, IAB-Doku) ((en))

Suggested Citation

  • Knize Estrada, Veronika J., 2018. "Migrant women labor-force participation in Germany : Human capital, segmented labor market, and gender perspectives," IAB-Discussion Paper 201812, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
  • Handle: RePEc:iab:iabdpa:201812
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Boll, Christina & Lagemann, Andreas, 2018. "Das Erwerbsverhalten von Eltern mit Migrationshintergrund: SOEP-basierte Befunde und deren Implikationen für Hamburg," HWWI Policy Papers 112, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    2. Clara Albrecht & Maria Hofbauer Pérez & Tanja Stitteneder, 2021. "Migrationsmonitor: Die Bedeutung geschlechtsspezifischer Ansätze für die Integration von weiblichen Geflüchteten," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 74(04), pages 63-69, April.
    3. Clara Albrecht & Maria Hofbauer Pérez & Tanja Stitteneder, 2021. "The Integration Challenges of Female Refugees and Migrants: Where Do We Stand?," CESifo Forum, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 22(02), pages 39-46, March.
    4. Boll, Christina & Lagemann, Andreas, 2018. "Does culture trump money? Employment and childcare use of migrant and non-migrant mothers of pre-school children in Germany," HWWI Research Papers 187, Hamburg Institute of International Economics (HWWI).
    5. Christina Boll & Andreas Lagemann, 2018. "Does Culture Trump Money? Erwerbsverhalten und Kitanutzung von Müttern mit und ohne Migrationshintergrund in Deutschland," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 1014, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    6. Fabian J. Baier & Paul J.J. Welfens & Tobias Zander, 2021. "Employment and Job Perspectives for Female Refugees in Germany: Analysis and Policy Implications from a Local Survey Study," EIIW Discussion paper disbei308, Universitätsbibliothek Wuppertal, University Library.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Bundesrepublik Deutschland ; ausländische Arbeitnehmer ; ausländische Frauen ; Einwanderer ; Erwerbsbeteiligung ; Herkunftsland ; Humankapitalansatz ; institutionelle Faktoren ; kulturelle Faktoren ; Muslime ; Qualifikationsstruktur ; IAB-SOEP-Migrationsstichprobe ; Segmentationstheorie ; Arbeitsmarktsegmentation ; 2013-2013;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J70 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - General
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • Z12 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Religion

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