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Income Distribution, Poverty Trap and Economic Growth

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  • Oyama, Masako

Abstract

The post-war growth experiences of developing countries lead to the idea that income equality may accelerate economic growth. In this paper, a theoretical model showed the possibility that equality makes a country human-capital abundant, which enables industrialization and higher economic growth. On the other hand, in unequal developing countries where majority of people manage to survive at minimum consumption level, human capital investment such as schooling cannot be done. Such countries become unskilled labor abundant and suffer further from low economic growth. In addition, the two-good framework showed the possibility that protecting infant industry with dynamic externality enhances economic growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Oyama, Masako, 2002. "Income Distribution, Poverty Trap and Economic Growth," Discussion Paper 106, Center for Intergenerational Studies, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  • Handle: RePEc:hit:piedp1:106
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    File URL: http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/rs/bitstream/10086/14431/1/pie_dp106.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alberto Alesina & Dani Rodrik, 1994. "Distributive Politics and Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 109(2), pages 465-490.
    2. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy & Robert Tamura, 1994. "Human Capital, Fertility, and Economic Growth," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 323-350 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Alesina, Alberto & Perotti, Roberto, 1996. "Income distribution, political instability, and investment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 40(6), pages 1203-1228, June.
    4. Oded Galor & Joseph Zeira, 1993. "Income Distribution and Macroeconomics," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 60(1), pages 35-52.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    income distribution; economic growth; human capital; comparative advantage; learning-by-doing;

    JEL classification:

    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • F11 - International Economics - - Trade - - - Neoclassical Models of Trade
    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models

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