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Marriage Penalty : Unconditional Quantile Regression of Housework Participation in Japan

Author

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  • Kolpashnikova, Kamila
  • Kan, Man Yee
  • Shirakawa, Kiyomi

Abstract

We analyze cross-sectional time-use diaries from the 2011 and 2016 Survey on Time Use and Leisure Activities (Shakai Seikatsu Kihon Chosa) to investigate the association between educational level and housework participation at different quantiles. Using the unconditional quantile regression method, we test whether education is associated with less time spent on housework as the previous research on highly educated people suggests. We find that this hypothesis stands only for non-married Japanese women. On the other hand, among married Japanese women, especially those without children in higher deciles of housework participation, are more likely to increase their participation in housework with the increase in their educational level. The results suggest that in Japan, the institute of marriage places higher expectations on women’s housework participation on married women with higher levels of education.

Suggested Citation

  • Kolpashnikova, Kamila & Kan, Man Yee & Shirakawa, Kiyomi, 2019. "Marriage Penalty : Unconditional Quantile Regression of Housework Participation in Japan," Discussion Paper Series 695, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  • Handle: RePEc:hit:hituec:695
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    File URL: https://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/hermes/ir/re/30404/DP695.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Yee Kan, Â Man & Laurie, Heather, 2016. "Gender, ethnicity and household labour in married and cohabiting couples in the UK," ISER Working Paper Series 2016-01, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    2. Man-Yee Kan & Ekaterina Hertog, 2017. "Domestic division of labour and fertility preference in China, Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 36(18), pages 557-588.
    3. Sergio Firpo & Nicole M. Fortin & Thomas Lemieux, 2009. "Unconditional Quantile Regressions," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 77(3), pages 953-973, May.
    4. Kamila Kolpashnikova, 2018. "American Househusbands: New Time Use Evidence of Gender Display, 2003–2016," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 140(3), pages 1259-1277, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kolpashnikova, Kamila & Chiba, Ryota & Shirakawa, Kiyomi, 2019. "Socioeconomic Status and Housework: Cultural Differences in Participation in Routine Housework in Japan, Canada, and the US," OSF Preprints 9tfce, Center for Open Science.
    2. Man-Yee Kan & Ekaterina Hertog & Kamila Kolpashnikova, 2019. "Housework share and fertility preference in four East Asian countries in 2006 and 2012," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 41(35), pages 1021-1046.
    3. Kolpashnikova, Kamila & Kan, Man-Yee & Shirakawa, Kiyomi, 2019. "Marriage and Housework: Analyzing the Effects of Education Using the 2011 and 2016 Japanese Survey on Time Use and Leisure Activities," SocArXiv 9shup, Center for Open Science.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender; housework; Japanese households; routine housework; unconditional quantile regression;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J0 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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