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Does Return Migration Affect Health Outcomes in Macedonia?

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  • Petreski, Marjan

Abstract

The objective of the paper is twofold: i) to investigate if living and working abroad has a meaningful role to play for the health of the return migrant; and ii) to understand if there are any spillovers of return-migrant member onto health conditions of the family members left behind. To that end, we use the DoTM Migration Survey 2009, as well a propensity score matching to address selectivity on observables and IV for the selectivity on unobservables. We also pursue interviews to contextualize the return migration – health nexus. Results suggest that when equalized on observables, return migrants have better health than non-migrants. Though, the reverse causality channel (less healthy individuals are more inclined to return) works to attenuate the true effect of return migration on health. Results further suggest a positive spillover effect of return migration on the health of the family members left behind, being mainly driven by the work of remittances sent while abroad, and not the returned wealth or the health knowledge transfer.

Suggested Citation

  • Petreski, Marjan, 2016. "Does Return Migration Affect Health Outcomes in Macedonia?," CEI Working Paper Series 2016-5, Center for Economic Institutions, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  • Handle: RePEc:hit:hitcei:2016-5
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    File URL: http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/rs/bitstream/10086/28191/1/wp2016-5.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Ernesto López-Córdova, 2005. "Globalization, Migration, and Development: The Role of Mexican Migrant Remittances," ECONOMIA JOURNAL, THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION - LACEA, vol. 0(Fall 2005), pages 217-248, August.
    2. Anita A Davies & Rosilyne M Borland & Carolyn Blake & Haley E West, 2011. "The Dynamics of Health and Return Migration," Working Papers id:4331, eSocialSciences.
    3. Catalina Amuedo-Dorantes & Susan Pozo, 2011. "New evidence on the role of remittances on healthcare expenditures by Mexican households," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(1), pages 69-98, March.
    4. McDonald, James Ted & Kennedy, Steven, 2004. "Insights into the 'healthy immigrant effect': health status and health service use of immigrants to Canada," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 59(8), pages 1613-1627, October.
    5. Marjan Petreski & Blagica Petreski, 2015. "Dissatisfied, feeling unequal and inclined to emigrate: Perceptions from Macedonia in a MIMIC model," Migration Letters, Transnational Press London, UK, vol. 12(3), pages 300-314, September.
    6. Blagica Petreski & Jorge Davalos & Despina Tumanoska, 2016. "Simulation of a voucher policy for improving the social condition of individual remittance receivers in Macedonia," Working Papers PMMA 2016-15, PEP-PMMA.
    7. Paul Glewwe, 1999. "Why Does Mother's Schooling Raise Child Health in Developing Countries? Evidence from Morocco," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 34(1), pages 124-159.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    return migration; health; Macedonia;

    JEL classification:

    • F22 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - International Migration
    • I19 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Other

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