IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hit/hiasdp/hias-e-71.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Hollowing Out or Filling In? Impacts of Multinational Enterprises on Domestic Plant Turnover and Job Growth in Factory Asia

Author

Listed:
  • CHUN, Hyunbae
  • HUR, Jung
  • SON, Nyeong Seon

Abstract

Recently multinational enterprises (MNEs) originating from Asian countries such as China and Korea have rapidly expanded their global operations, but the employment effect of these MNEs in their home countries has rarely been studied. Using Korean firm–plant matched data over 2008–2013, we examine the effects of MNEs on domestic plant turnover and job growth. We find that Korean MNEs are more likely than non–MNEs to not only close down their domestic manufacturing plants but also open new plants. Along with active plant turnover, Korean MNEs exhibit greater active job reallocation across their domestic manufacturing plants within firms; however, this does not result in net job loss. This suggests that Korean MNEs participating in Factory Asia restructured their domestic manufacturing bases rather than hollowing them out.

Suggested Citation

  • CHUN, Hyunbae & HUR, Jung & SON, Nyeong Seon, 2018. "Hollowing Out or Filling In? Impacts of Multinational Enterprises on Domestic Plant Turnover and Job Growth in Factory Asia," Discussion paper series HIAS-E-71, Hitotsubashi Institute for Advanced Study, Hitotsubashi University.
  • Handle: RePEc:hit:hiasdp:hias-e-71
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hermes-ir.lib.hit-u.ac.jp/rs/bitstream/10086/29276/1/070_hiasDP-E-71.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Roger Bandick, 2010. "Multinationals and plant survival," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer;Institut für Weltwirtschaft (Kiel Institute for the World Economy), vol. 146(4), pages 609-634, December.
    2. Andrew B Bernard & J. Bradford Jensen, 2007. "Firm Structure, Multinationals, and Manufacturing Plant Deaths," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 89(2), pages 193-204, May.
    3. Lipsey, Robert E. & Sjöholm, Fredrik, 2011. "South–South FDI and Development in East Asia," Asian Development Review, Asian Development Bank, vol. 28(2), pages 11-31.
    4. Pär Hansson, 2005. "Skill Upgrading and Production Transfer within Swedish Multinationals," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 107(4), pages 673-692, December.
    5. Helen Simpson, 2012. "How do Firms’ Outward FDI Strategies Relate to their Activity at Home? Empirical Evidence for the UK," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 35(3), pages 243-272, March.
    6. Steven J. Davis & John C. Haltiwanger & Scott Schuh, 1998. "Job Creation and Destruction," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262540932, January.
    7. Markusen, James R., 1984. "Multinationals, multi-plant economies, and the gains from trade," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3-4), pages 205-226, May.
    8. Braconier, Henrik & Ekholm, Karolina, 2000. "Swedish Multinationals and Competition from High- and Low-Wage Locations," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 8(3), pages 448-461, August.
    9. Gibson, John K & Harris, Richard I D, 1996. "Trade Liberalisation and Plant Exit in New Zealand Manufacturing," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 78(3), pages 521-529, August.
    10. Debaere, Peter & Lee, Hongshik & Lee, Joonhyung, 2010. "It matters where you go: Outward foreign direct investment and multinational employment growth at home," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 91(2), pages 301-309, March.
    11. Head, Keith & Ries, John, 2002. "Offshore production and skill upgrading by Japanese manufacturing firms," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 58(1), pages 81-105, October.
    12. Richard Disney & Jonathan Haskel & Ylva Heden, 2003. "Entry, Exit and Establishment Survival in UK Manufacturing," Journal of Industrial Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 51(1), pages 91-112, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Employment; Job Reallocation; Multinational Enterprise; Plant Birth; Plant Death;

    JEL classification:

    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • F66 - International Economics - - Economic Impacts of Globalization - - - Labor
    • L23 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Organization of Production

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hit:hiasdp:hias-e-71. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Digital Resources Section, Hitotsubashi University Library). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/ashitjp.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.