IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/hir/idecdp/3-2.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Assessing Inequalities in Thai Education

Author

Listed:
  • Jirada Prasartpornsirichoke

    (Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation, Hiroshima University)

  • Yoshi Takahashi

    (Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation, Hiroshima University)

Abstract

Using data from Thailand's Household Socioeconomic Survey, this paper measures the inequalities of Thai education in 2011. We utilize the Gini coefficients to estimate Thai educational inequalities from cumulative years of educational attainment which are between zero (no schooling) to twenty-one (doctoral level) years. The education Gini coefficient of the whole country is 0.349. At the provincial level, the Gini coefficients are in a range between 0.272 (Nonthaburi) and 0.521 (Mae hong son). The provinces located near the Bangkok metropolis have greater equality in education, except for Samut Sakhon, while the provinces in the northern part of Thailand have severe inequality in education, especially the border provinces. As for the effect of schooling on educational inequality, we found that at the regional level, average years of schooling was significantly and negatively associated with the educational inequality, except in the northern part of Thailand. The magnitudes of coefficients of average years of schooling in the northern and southern parts are twice that of the central part of Thailand. The policy implication of this paper is that the Thai government should pay attention to two points in adjusting the scope of distribution: reduce the number of people without schooling and extend the educational attainment of people with primary education to secondary education. At the regional level, the policy of education expansion for reducing educational inequality is workable only in central Thailand, the north, and the south. Governments should utilize different policies in each region. In addition, the Thai government should pay more attention to solving the social problems which contribute to the issue of educational inequality.

Suggested Citation

  • Jirada Prasartpornsirichoke & Yoshi Takahashi, 2013. "Assessing Inequalities in Thai Education," IDEC DP2 Series 3-2, Hiroshima University, Graduate School for International Development and Cooperation (IDEC).
  • Handle: RePEc:hir:idecdp:3-2
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://ir.lib.hiroshima-u.ac.jp/files/public/34542/2014101620264954032/IDEC-DP2_03-2.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2013
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Gilles Duranton & Matthew A. Turner, 2011. "The Fundamental Law of Road Congestion: Evidence from US Cities," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 101(6), pages 2616-2652, October.
    2. Yuichiro Yoshida, 2011. "Pricing, Capacity, And Construction Boundary Of A Congestible Highway With An Elastic Demand: Social Optimum, Second Best, Privatization, And Vertical Disintegration," The Japanese Economic Review, Japanese Economic Association, vol. 62(3), pages 401-424, September.
    3. J. Barkley Rosser, 2009. "Introduction," Chapters,in: Handbook of Research on Complexity, chapter 1 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Su, Qing, 2010. "Travel demand in the US urban areas: A system dynamic panel data approach," Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 110-117, February.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:col:000174:015711 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. repec:lde:journl:y:2017:i:87:p:165-190 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Inequality in education; the Gini coefficient; Years of schooling; Thai education;

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:hir:idecdp:3-2. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Keisuke Kawata). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/gshirjp.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.