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Anomie And Alienation In The Post-Communist Area: A Reapplication Of The Middleton Scale In Russia And Kazakhstan

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  • Ekaterina I. Lytkina

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics)

Abstract

Unlike commonly used, anomie and alienation not only have different theoretical backgrounds, but also different indicators and predictors. I examine the highly institutionalized alienation scale originally introduced by Middleton (1963), reapplied as a measurement of alienation (Seeman, 1991) and anomie (Huschka and Mau 2005, 2006) in a very relevant context for an anomic situation – the post-Communist countries Russia and Kazakhstan (round six of the World Values Surveys fielded the alienation question in just these two countries). Based on confirmatory factor analysis and multiple group comparisons, I find that the scale consists of two dimensions, which can be described as an anomie and alienation. The anomic dimension consists of indicators “normlessness” and “powerlessness,” whereas the alienative one is comprised by “social isolation”, “meaninglessness,” and “job dissatisfaction.” Though the structure proves to have full invariance in both countries, the predictors for anomie and alienation are different. For both countries, only income is an important predictor for anomie, and though to a lower degree, for alienation. In Kazakhstan, the level of urbanization also provides an impact on the level of anomie. Apart from income, in Russia alienation can be predicted by gender, and type of occupation (manual or intellectual), whereas in Kazakhstan it can be predicted by age

Suggested Citation

  • Ekaterina I. Lytkina, 2015. "Anomie And Alienation In The Post-Communist Area: A Reapplication Of The Middleton Scale In Russia And Kazakhstan," HSE Working papers WP BRP 32/PSY/2015, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hig:wpaper:32psy2015
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    File URL: http://www.hse.ru/data/2015/02/20/1090834924/32PSY2015.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Eva Tsahuridu, 2011. "An Exploration of Factors Affecting Work Anomia," Journal of Business Ethics, Springer, vol. 99(2), pages 297-305, March.
    2. Denis Huschka & Steffen Mau, 2006. "Social Anomie and Racial Segregation in South Africa," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 76(3), pages 467-498, May.
    3. Mary Yoko Brannen & Mark F Peterson, 2009. "Merging without alienating: interventions promoting cross-cultural organizational integration and their limitations," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 40(3), pages 468-489, April.
    4. Robert Travis, 1993. "The MOS Alienation Scale: An alternative to Srole's Anomia Scale," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 28(1), pages 71-91, January.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    anomie; alienation; Russia; Kazakhstan; measurement invariance;

    JEL classification:

    • B14 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - History of Economic Thought through 1925 - - - Socialist; Marxist
    • C38 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Classification Methdos; Cluster Analysis; Principal Components; Factor Analysis
    • C39 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Other
    • P20 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - General

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