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Does Oil Price Uncertainty Transmit to Stock Markets?

  • Ågren, Martin

    (Department of Economics)

The paper presents an empirical study of volatility spillover from oil prices to stock markets within an asymmetric BEKK model. Using weekly data on the aggregate stock markets of Japan, Norway, Sweden, the U.K., and the U.S., strong evidence of volatility spillover is found for all stock markets but the Swedish one, where only weak evidence is found. News impact surfaces show that, although statistically significant, the volatility spillovers are quantitatively small. The stock market’s own shocks, which are related to other factors of uncertainty than the oil price, are more prominent than oil shocks.

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Paper provided by Uppsala University, Department of Economics in its series Working Paper Series with number 2006:23.

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Length: 29 pages
Date of creation: 17 Oct 2006
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:uunewp:2006_023
Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, Uppsala University, P. O. Box 513, SE-751 20 Uppsala, Sweden
Phone: + 46 18 471 25 00
Fax: + 46 18 471 14 78
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  1. Ng, Angela, 2000. "Volatility spillover effects from Japan and the US to the Pacific-Basin," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 19(2), pages 207-233, April.
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