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Who do High-growth Firms Employ, and Who do they Hire?

Author

Listed:
  • Coad, Alex

    () (Science and Technology Policy Research (SPRU), Freeman Centre, University of Sussex)

  • Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov

    () (The Swedish Retail Institute (HUI) and Dalarna University)

  • Johansson, Dan

    () (The Ratio Institute)

  • Wennberg, Karl

    () (The Ratio Institute and Stockholm School of Economics)

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to study who high- growth firms (HGFs) hire using a matched employer-employee dataset for all knowledge intensive industries in Sweden, where high growth is measured over the period 1999-2002. The results indicate that HGFs to a larger extent employ young people, immigrants, and individuals with longer unemployment periods. However, these patterns seem contingent on the stage of firm evolution. HGFs that have already realized rapid growth seem to start focusing on hiring individuals from other companies, even though immigrants are still overrepresented among new employees.

Suggested Citation

  • Coad, Alex & Daunfeldt, Sven-Olov & Johansson, Dan & Wennberg, Karl, 2011. "Who do High-growth Firms Employ, and Who do they Hire?," Ratio Working Papers 169, The Ratio Institute.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:ratioi:0169
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Leland D. Crane, 2014. "Firm Dynamics and Assortative Matching," Working Papers 14-25, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    2. Neil Lee, 2014. "What holds back high-growth firms? Evidence from UK SMEs," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 43(1), pages 183-195, June.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Gazelles; firm growth; rapid firm growth; high-impact firms;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • L25 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Firm Performance
    • L26 - Industrial Organization - - Firm Objectives, Organization, and Behavior - - - Entrepreneurship

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