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Explaining the past, predicting the future: the influence of regional trajectories on innovation networks of new industries in emerging economies

Author

Listed:
  • Plechero, Monica

    () (University of Florence)

  • Mandar, Kulkarni

    () (International Institute of Information Technology)

  • Chaminade, Cristina

    () (Lund University)

  • Balaji, Parthasarathy

    () (International Institute of Information Technology)

Abstract

Economic geographers have recently made important contributions to the relationship between regional transformation, industrial specialisation and innovation networks in the emergence of new industries. However, most contemporary research has focused on the influence of networks on regional trajectories, paying lip service to how regional trajectories also influence network configurations. Furthermore, international comparative research on how specific regional innovation system (RIS) trajectories may shape innovation networks in new industrial sectors is underdeveloped. The paper investigates how the trajectories of Bangalore and Beijing RISs influence the objectives and geographical configuration of innovation networks in the new media industry. The coevolution of the different elements of the RIS trajectory points to the unfolding of politically and institutionally driven trajectory in Beijing and cognitively driven trajectory in Bangalore. These trajectories lead to specific barriers and opportunities for the development of innovation networks in new industries.

Suggested Citation

  • Plechero, Monica & Mandar, Kulkarni & Chaminade, Cristina & Balaji, Parthasarathy, 2019. "Explaining the past, predicting the future: the influence of regional trajectories on innovation networks of new industries in emerging economies," Papers in Innovation Studies 2019/15, Lund University, CIRCLE - Center for Innovation Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:lucirc:2019_015
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    RIS trajectories; Innovation networks; New media industry; Beijing; Bangalore;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O19 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - International Linkages to Development; Role of International Organizations
    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • R50 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Regional Government Analysis - - - General

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