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Spatial Clustering Of Artists

Author

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  • Andersson , Åke E.

    () (Department of Economics, Finance and Statistics, Jönköping International Business School, Jönköping, Sweden)

  • Andersson , David E.

    () (Department of Economics and Quantitative Methods, Nottingham University Business School, University of Nottingham, Ningbo, Zhejiang, China)

  • Daghbashyan, Zara

    () (Department of Industrial Economics and Management, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm)

  • Hårsman, Björn

    () (Department of Industrial Economics and Management, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm)

Abstract

Surveys of artists’ location choices show that they disproportionately reside in large cities. This paper introduces a model that attempts to explain this urban preference. The model includes four factors: access to other artists, access to consumers, access to service jobs, and housing affordability. These four factors are combined in a spatial equilibrium model. Subsequently, the model is used for an econometric estimation of factor effects. The results show that access to other artists and local access to service jobs are important localization factors. Educated labor used as a proxy for consumer demand has a significant effect on artists' location choices.

Suggested Citation

  • Andersson , Åke E. & Andersson , David E. & Daghbashyan, Zara & Hårsman, Björn, 2013. "Spatial Clustering Of Artists," INDEK Working Paper Series 2013/2, Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Industrial Economics and Management.
  • Handle: RePEc:hhs:kthind:2013_002
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Fikri Zul Fahmi & Philip McCann & Sierdjan Koster, 2017. "Creative economy policy in developing countries: The case of Indonesia," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 54(6), pages 1367-1384, May.
    2. Coll Martínez, Eva & Arauzo Carod, Josep Maria, 2015. "Creative Industries: a Preliminary Insight to their Location Determinants," Working Papers 2072/250133, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Department of Economics.
    3. Schuetz, Jenny, 2015. "Why are Walmart and Target Next-Door neighbors?," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(C), pages 38-48.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    location choice; artists; clustering; knowledge externalities;

    JEL classification:

    • R12 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Size and Spatial Distributions of Regional Economic Activity; Interregional Trade (economic geography)
    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns
    • R15 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Econometric and Input-Output Models; Other Methods
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • Z11 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economics of the Arts and Literature

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