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Does openness reduce wage inequality in developing countries? A panel data analysis

  • Munshi, Farzana

    ()

    (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

This paper provides panel data evidence on trade liberalization and wage inequality in Bangladesh. Using several standard econometric models, wage equations for skilled and unskilled workers in the formal manufacturing sector are estimated for the 1975-2002 period. The results, particularly the estimates from a dynamic fixed effects model, provide some weak evidence that openness contributes to a reduction in wage inequality between skilled and unskilled workers. The results also indicate that real wages of both unskilled and skilled workers increased during the period.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/2665
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Paper provided by University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers in Economics with number 241.

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Length: 26 pages
Date of creation: 14 Dec 2006
Date of revision: 06 Feb 2008
Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0241
Contact details of provider: Postal: Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Box 640, SE 405 30 GÖTEBORG, Sweden
Phone: 031-773 10 00
Web page: http://www.handels.gu.se/econ/

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  1. Jörg Breitung & M. Hashem Pesaran, 2005. "Unit Roots and Cointegration in Panels," IEPR Working Papers 05.32, Institute of Economic Policy Research (IEPR).
  2. Athukorala, Prema-chandra & Rajapatirana, Sarath, 2000. "Liberalization and Industrial Transformation: Lessons from the Sri Lankan Experience," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 48(3), pages 543-72, April.
  3. Feenstra, Robert C. & Hanson, Gordon H., 1997. "Foreign direct investment and relative wages: Evidence from Mexico's maquiladoras," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(3-4), pages 371-393, May.
  4. Galiani, Sebastian & Sanguinetti, Pablo, 2003. "The impact of trade liberalization on wage inequality: evidence from Argentina," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(2), pages 497-513, December.
  5. Daron Acemoglu, 1999. "Patterns of Skill Premia," NBER Working Papers 7018, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Hausman, Jerry, 2015. "Specification tests in econometrics," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 38(2), pages 112-134.
  7. Robert C. Feenstra & Gordon H. Hanson, 1995. "Foreign Investment, Outsourcing and Relative Wages," NBER Working Papers 5121, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  8. Durevall, Dick & Munshi, Farzana, 2006. "Trade Liberalization and Wage Inequality: Empirical Evidence from Bangladesh," Working Papers in Economics 205, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  9. Nina Pavcnik, 2000. "What Explains Skill Upgrading in Less Developed Countries?," NBER Working Papers 7846, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  10. Prachi Mishra & Utsav Kumar, 2005. "Trade Liberalization and Wage Inequality; Evidence From India," IMF Working Papers 05/20, International Monetary Fund.
  11. Levin, Andrew & Lin, Chien-Fu & James Chu, Chia-Shang, 2002. "Unit root tests in panel data: asymptotic and finite-sample properties," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 108(1), pages 1-24, May.
  12. Revenga, Ana, 1995. "Employment and wage effects of trade liberalization : the case of Mexican manufacturing," Policy Research Working Paper Series 1524, The World Bank.
  13. Arellano, Manuel & Bond, Stephen, 1991. "Some Tests of Specification for Panel Data: Monte Carlo Evidence and an Application to Employment Equations," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 58(2), pages 277-97, April.
  14. Beyer, Harald & Rojas, Patricio & Vergara, Rodrigo, 1999. "Trade liberalization and wage inequality," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(1), pages 103-123, June.
  15. Zadia M. Feliciano, 2001. "Workers and trade liberalization: The impact of trade reforms in Mexico on wages and employment," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 55(1), pages 95-115, October.
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