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The Sources of Productivity Growth in Canada

Author

Listed:
  • Carlaw, K.
  • Kosempel, S.

Abstract

A competitive general equilibrium models is constructed and used to identify sources of productivity growth in Canada and to quantify their importance. The model also provides procedures for constructing various economic time series. We find that periods of low productivity growth correspond to periods of high investment-specific technological change or high rates of technology embodiment.

Suggested Citation

  • Carlaw, K. & Kosempel, S., 2000. "The Sources of Productivity Growth in Canada," Working Papers 2000-9, University of Guelph, Department of Economics and Finance, revised 2003.
  • Handle: RePEc:gue:guelph:2000-9
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    File URL: http://www.uoguelph.ca/economics/repec/workingpapers/2000/2000-09.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:ucp:bknber:9780226304557 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Zvi Griliches, 1998. "Productivity, R&D, and the Data Constraint," NBER Chapters,in: R&D and Productivity: The Econometric Evidence, pages 347-374 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Jorgenson, Dale W., 1966. "The Embodiment Hypothesis," Scholarly Articles 3403063, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    4. Dale W. Jorgenson, 1966. "The Embodiment Hypothesis," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 74, pages 1-1.
    5. Hulten, Charles R, 1992. "Growth Accounting When Technical Change Is Embodied in Capital," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 964-980, September.
    6. Greenwood, Jeremy & Hercowitz, Zvi & Krusell, Per, 1997. "Long-Run Implications of Investment-Specific Technological Change," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 87(3), pages 342-362, June.
    7. Kenneth I. Carlaw & Richard G. Lipsey, 2003. "Productivity, Technology and Economic Growth: What is the Relationship?," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 17(3), pages 457-495, July.
    8. Robert J. Gordon, 1990. "The Measurement of Durable Goods Prices," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number gord90-1.
    9. Charles R. Hulten, 1992. "Growth Accounting When Technical Change is Embodied in Capital," NBER Working Papers 3971, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    10. Carlaw, K. & Kosempel, S., 2001. "Accounting for Canada's Economic Growth: A GE Approach," Working Papers 2001-1, University of Guelph, Department of Economics and Finance.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Stephen Kosempel & Kenneth Carlaw, 2003. "Accounting For Canada¡¯S Economic Growth," Journal of Economic Development, Chung-Ang Unviersity, Department of Economics, vol. 28(2), pages 83-101, December.
    2. Carlaw, K. & Kosempel, S., 2001. "Accounting for Canada's Economic Growth: A GE Approach," Working Papers 2001-1, University of Guelph, Department of Economics and Finance.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    TECHNOLOGY ; PRODUCTIVITY ; ECONOMIC GROWTH ; INVESTMENTS;

    JEL classification:

    • D24 - Microeconomics - - Production and Organizations - - - Production; Cost; Capital; Capital, Total Factor, and Multifactor Productivity; Capacity
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence

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