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From interaction economics to economic geography : theories and evidences (In French)

  • Jérome VICENTE (GRES-LEREPS)

The paper focuses on the prospects interaction economics opens in the economic geography field. The first part is devoted to the conditions in which interaction economics emerges and develops. The second one focuses on the main concepts and models. In the third one, we show through a recent research survey, that sequential, cumulative and non-market interaction approach allows to explain the emergence and stability of agglomeration structures. The paper ends up in the prospects interaction economics opens, in a spatial competition context, about local policy modes

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File URL: http://cahiersdugres.u-bordeaux4.fr/2003/2003-02.pdf
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Paper provided by Groupement de Recherches Economiques et Sociales in its series Cahiers du GRES (2002-2009) with number 2003-02.

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Date of creation: 2003
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Handle: RePEc:grs:wpegrs:2003-02
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://gres.u-bordeaux4.fr/

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  1. Andr Torre Shaw & Jean-Pierre Gilly, 2000. "On the Analytical Dimension of Proximity Dynamics," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 34(2), pages 169-180.
  2. Edward L. Glaeser & Jose A. Scheinkman, 2001. "Non-Market Interactions," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers 1914, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
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  4. Dosi, G & Kaniovski, Y, 1994. "On "Badly Behaved" Dynamics: Some Applications of Generalized Urn Schemes to Technological and Economic Change," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 4(2), pages 93-123, June.
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  8. Follmer, Hans, 1974. "Random economies with many interacting agents," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 1(1), pages 51-62, March.
  9. Jean-Benoît Zimmermann & Alexandre Steyer, 1996. "Externalités de réseau et adoption d'un standard dans une structure résiliaire," Revue d'Économie Industrielle, Programme National Persée, vol. 76(1), pages 67-90.
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  12. Boyer, Robert & Orlean, Andre, 1992. "How Do Conventions Evolve?," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 2(3), pages 165-77, October.
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  14. repec:cai:recosp:reco_p1991_42n2_0233 is not listed on IDEAS
  15. Gabszewicz, Jean J., 2000. "Strategic Interaction and Markets," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198233411, March.
  16. Thomas Brenner, 1998. "Can evolutionary algorithms describe learning processes?," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 8(3), pages 271-283.
  17. Banerjee, Abhijit V, 1992. "A Simple Model of Herd Behavior," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(3), pages 797-817, August.
  18. Alan P. Kirman, 1992. "Whom or What Does the Representative Individual Represent?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 6(2), pages 117-136, Spring.
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