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Regional differences in productivity growth in The Netherlands: an industry-level growth accounting

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  • Broersma, Lourens
  • Dijk, Jouke van

    (Groningen University)

Abstract

It is well known that the productivity growth in Europe is slowing down, against an increasing growth rate in the US. The Netherlands is one of countries in Europe with the lowest growth rates of productivity. This paper presents the results of a growth accounting exercise applied to regional industry data of The Netherlands between 1995-2002. We find that low productivity growth in The Netherlands is particularly situated in the economic core regions of the west and south and is caused by slow growth of MFP. Compared to the more peripheral regions, MFP-growth is lower in all industries, except social and non-market services. The high level of traffic congestion and relatively low labour effort in the core regions can explain part of this slow MFP-growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Broersma, Lourens & Dijk, Jouke van, 2005. "Regional differences in productivity growth in The Netherlands: an industry-level growth accounting," CCSO Working Papers 200504, University of Groningen, CCSO Centre for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:gro:rugccs:200504
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    1. Broersma, Lourens & Dijk, Jouke van, 2003. "Arbeidsproductiviteit in Fryslân : een analyse van het niveau en de groei van 1990-2000," Research Reports 2003305, University of Groningen, Urban and Regional Studies Institute (URSI).
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    11. repec:dgr:rugurs:2003305 is not listed on IDEAS
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    16. Lourens Broersma & Jouke Van Dijk, 2005. "Regional Differences In Labour Productivity In The Netherlands," Tijdschrift voor Economische en Sociale Geografie, Royal Dutch Geographical Society KNAG, vol. 96(3), pages 334-343, July.
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