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Is Literacy a Multi-dimensional Concept? Some Empirical Evidence

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  • Georgios A. Panos
  • Theocharis Kromydas
  • Michael Osborne
  • Robert E. Wright

Abstract

Literacy is a multi-dimensional concept. In this chapter, seven potential dimensions of literacy are considered: (1) Mathematical literacy, (2) Foreign language literacy, (3) Digital literacy, (4) Financial literacy, (5) Political literacy, (6) Environmental literacy, and (7) Health literacy. Data from the Glasgow-based Integrated Multimedia City Data (iMCD) project included information that allows for the operationalization of these dimensions. Multiple-regression analysis is used to explore the correlates of these dimensions of literacy. One key finding is that there are gender differences in all the dimensions of literacy. There are large advantages in favour of males with respect to political, digital, financial, and environmental literacy, health and mathematical literacy. The only advantage in the favour of females is foreign language literacy.

Suggested Citation

  • Georgios A. Panos & Theocharis Kromydas & Michael Osborne & Robert E. Wright, 2020. "Is Literacy a Multi-dimensional Concept? Some Empirical Evidence," Working Papers 2020_27, Business School - Economics, University of Glasgow.
  • Handle: RePEc:gla:glaewp:2020_27
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Denver, David & Hands, Gordon, 1990. "Does Studying Politics Make a Difference? The Political Knowledge, Attitudes and Perceptions of School Students," British Journal of Political Science, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(2), pages 263-279, April.
    2. Annamaria Lusardi & Olivia S. Mitchell, 2014. "The Economic Importance of Financial Literacy: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 52(1), pages 5-44, March.
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G53 - Financial Economics - - Household Finance - - - Financial Literacy
    • I22 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Educational Finance; Financial Aid
    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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