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Shallow determinants of growth of Polish regions. Empirical analysis with panel data methods

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  • Tomasz Brodzicki

    () (Faculty of Economics, University of Gdansk)

Abstract

We derive and then estimate an augmented growth model to identify major shallow determinants of development of Polish regions at NUTS-2 level of spatial disaggregation. Of particular interest to us is an attempt to assess the impact of investment in transport infrastructure and investment in human capital related to a large influx of Structural Funds after the accession in 2004 to European Union. We utilize various panel data techniques in order to reach the major conclusion. Most of results are in line with theoretical predictions. The obtained results are however sensitive to the introduction of spatial effects and their particular specifications. At regional level agglomeration effects are clear with metropolitan status of a region playing a significant role in development. Polycentric core-periphery model seems to suit the Polish framework conditions.

Suggested Citation

  • Tomasz Brodzicki, 2015. "Shallow determinants of growth of Polish regions. Empirical analysis with panel data methods," Working Papers of Economics of European Integration Division 1504, The Univeristy of Gdansk, Faculty of Economics, Economics of European Integration Division.
  • Handle: RePEc:gda:wpaper:1504
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    File URL: http://gnu.univ.gda.pl/~keie/aio35.pdf
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    1. Philippe Aghion & Diego Comin & Peter Howitt & Isabel Tecu, 2016. "When Does Domestic Savings Matter for Economic Growth?," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 64(3), pages 381-407, August.
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    Keywords

    regional development; economic growth; panel data analysis;

    JEL classification:

    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • R10 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - General
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

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