IDEAS home Printed from
   My bibliography  Save this paper

The Determinants of De Novo Bank Survival


  • Robert DeYoung
  • Iftekhar Hasan
  • William C. Hunter


The number of newly chartered, or 'de novo,' commercial banks in the U.S. has increased every year since 1994. These new banks are potentially important for preserving competition and providing credit in consolidating banking markets. However, like other new business ventures, newly chartered banks can be prone to failure. To investigate the long-run financial viability of newly chartered banks, we estimate a 'split-population' duration model for 656 commercial banks chartered in 1984 and 1985. To provide a benchmark, we estimate a similar model for 1,288 small established banks located in the same geographic markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Robert DeYoung & Iftekhar Hasan & William C. Hunter, 1999. "The Determinants of De Novo Bank Survival," New York University, Leonard N. Stern School Finance Department Working Paper Seires 99-066, New York University, Leonard N. Stern School of Business-.
  • Handle: RePEc:fth:nystfi:99-066

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL:
    Download Restriction: no

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Wheelock, David C & Wilson, Paul W, 1995. "Explaining Bank Failures: Deposit Insurance, Regulation, and Efficiency," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(4), pages 689-700, November.
    2. DeYoung, Robert & Hasan, Iftekhar, 1998. "The performance of de novo commercial banks: A profit efficiency approach," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 565-587, May.
    3. Schmidt, Peter & Witte, Ann Dryden, 1989. "Predicting criminal recidivism using 'split population' survival time models," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 40(1), pages 141-159, January.
    4. Robert DeYoung, 1999. "Birth, growth, and life or death of newly chartered banks," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q III, pages 18-35.
    5. Gary Whalen, 1991. "A proportional hazards model of bank failure: an examination of its usefulness as an early warning tool," Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, issue Q I, pages 21-31.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)


    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Rachele Anna Ambrosio & Paolo Coccorese, 2015. "Bad Loans and De Novo Banks: Evidence From Italy," Economic Notes, Banca Monte dei Paschi di Siena SpA, vol. 44(1), pages 101-122, February.
    2. Männasoo, Kadri & Mayes, David G., 2009. "Explaining bank distress in Eastern European transition economies," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 244-253, February.
    3. Albert DePrince & William Ford & Pamela Morris, 2011. "Some causes of interstate differences in community bank performance," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 35(1), pages 22-40, January.
    4. O. Emre Ergungor, 2002. "Community banks as small business lenders: the tough road ahead," Working Paper 0203, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    5. O. Emre Ergungor & C. N. V. Krishnan & Ajai K. Singh & Allan A. Zebedee, 2005. "Offer-price discount of bank seasoned equity offers: do voluntary and involuntary offers convey different information?," Working Paper 0515, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.

    More about this item


    Access and download statistics


    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:fth:nystfi:99-066. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Thomas Krichel). General contact details of provider: .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.