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Agricultural value chain development in practice: Private sector-led smallholder development:

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  • Kolavalli, Shashidhara
  • Mensah-Bonsu, Akwasi
  • Zaman, Saima

Abstract

Value chain development is adopted widely as a private sector–led approach to agricultural development that can benefit smallholders. The objective of this research is to understand how development organizations are conceptualizing and developing agricultural value chains in Ghana to include smallholders. The study is based on case studies of five programs supported by various donors. A typology is employed to categorize the intervention. Common to all the programs are interventions to encourage the development of interlinked vertical contracts between smallholders and buyers and investments to improve the operations of actors downstream. The study explores issues related to expectations, scaling up of activities to reach a significant portion of the population, technology transfer, and participatory development of value chain strategies and identifies some indicators to examine the outcomes of value chain interventions.

Suggested Citation

  • Kolavalli, Shashidhara & Mensah-Bonsu, Akwasi & Zaman, Saima, 2015. "Agricultural value chain development in practice: Private sector-led smallholder development:," IFPRI discussion papers 1460, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:1460
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Porter, Gina & Phillips-Howard[malt], Kevin, 1997. "Comparing contracts: An evaluation of contract farming schemes in Africa," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 227-238, February.
    2. Lone Riisgaard & Simon Bolwig & Stefano Ponte & Andries du Toit & Niels Halberg & Frank Matose, 2010. "Integrating Poverty and Environmental Concerns into Value-Chain Analysis: A Strategic Framework and Practical Guide," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 28(2), pages 195-216, March.
    3. Johann Kirsten & Kurt Sartorius, 2002. "Linking agribusiness and small-scale farmers in developing countries: Is there a new role for contract farming?," Development Southern Africa, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(4), pages 503-529.
    4. Johan F. M. Swinnen & Miet Maertens, 2007. "Globalization, privatization, and vertical coordination in food value chains in developing and transition countries," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 37(s1), pages 89-102, December.
    5. Barrett, Christopher B. & Bachke, Maren E. & Bellemare, Marc F. & Michelson, Hope C. & Narayanan, Sudha & Walker, Thomas F., 2012. "Smallholder Participation in Contract Farming: Comparative Evidence from Five Countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 715-730.
    6. C. Martin Webber & Patrick Labaste, 2010. "Building Competitiveness in Africa's Agriculture : A Guide to Value Chain Concepts and Applications," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2401, June.
    7. Colin Poulton & Jonathan Kydd & Andrew Dorward, 2006. "Overcoming Market Constraints on Pro-Poor Agricultural Growth in Sub-Saharan Africa," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 24(3), pages 243-277, May.
    8. Collier, Paul & Dercon, Stefan, 2014. "African Agriculture in 50Years: Smallholders in a Rapidly Changing World?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 92-101.
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    Cited by:

    1. Ragasa, Catherine & Lambrecht, Isabel & Kufoalor, Doreen S., 2018. "Limitations of Contract Farming as a Pro-poor Strategy: The Case of Maize Outgrower Schemes in Upper West Ghana," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 102(C), pages 30-56.
    2. Lambrecht, Isabel & Ragasa, Catherine, 2016. "Do development projects crowd out private-sector activities? A survival analysis of contract farming participation in northern Ghana," IFPRI discussion papers 1575, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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    Keywords

    smallholders; agricultural development; private sector;

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