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Measuring power


  • Frankenberg, Elizabeth
  • Thomas, Duncan


This paper focuses on dynamics within couples, although the authors recognize that dynamics among extended family members and across generations are of substantial interest. Decisions about resource allocations, control over economic resources, whether and how much one works, are all examined.

Suggested Citation

  • Frankenberg, Elizabeth & Thomas, Duncan, 2001. "Measuring power," FCND discussion papers 113, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:fcnddp:113

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    • Frankenberg, Elizabeth & Thomas, Duncan, 2001. "Measuring power," FCND briefs 113, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Lundberg, Shelly & Pollak, Robert A, 1993. "Separate Spheres Bargaining and the Marriage Market," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(6), pages 988-1010, December.
    2. Bouis, Howarth E., 1994. "Agricultural technology and food policy to combat iron deficiency in developing countries," FCND discussion papers 1, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2001. "Land, trees, and women: evolution of land tenure institutions in Western Ghana and Sumatra," Research reports 121, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
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    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.

    Cited by:

    1. Quisumbing, Agnes R., 2003. "Food Aid and Child Nutrition in Rural Ethiopia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(7), pages 1309-1324, July.
    2. Schady, Norbert & Rosero, José, 2008. "Are cash transfers made to women spent like other sources of income?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 101(3), pages 246-248, December.
    3. Wouterse, Fleur Stephanie, 2016. "The distribution of power and household behavior: Evidence from Niger:," IFPRI discussion papers 1548, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    4. Floro, Maria & Antonopoulos, Rania, 2004. "Asset Depletion Among the Poor: Does Gender Matter? The Case of Urban Households in Thailand," Vassar College Department of Economics Working Paper Series 59, Vassar College Department of Economics.
    5. Quisumbing, Agnes R. & McClafferty, Bonnie, 2006. "Using gender research in development: food security in practice," Food security in practice technical guide series 2, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    6. Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Yohannes, Yisehac, 2005. "How fair is workfare? gender, public works, and employment in rural Ethiopia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3492, The World Bank.
    7. Seebens, Holger, 2006. "Bargaining over Fertility in Rural Ethiopia," Proceedings of the German Development Economics Conference, Berlin 2006 25, Verein für Socialpolitik, Research Committee Development Economics.


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