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How do exogenous shocks cause bankruptcy? Balance sheet and income statement channels

Author

Listed:
  • Mikhed, Vyacheslav

    (Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia)

  • Scholnick, Barry

    (University of Alberta)

Abstract

We are the first to examine whether exogenous shocks cause personal bankruptcy through the balance sheet channel and/or the income statement channel. For identification, we examine the effect of exogenous, politically motivated government payments on 200,000 Canadian bankruptcy filings. We find support for the balance sheet channel, in that receipt of the exogenous cash increases the net balance sheet benefits of bankruptcy (unsecured debt discharged minus liquidated assets forgone) required by filers. We also find limited support for the income statement channel, in that exogenous payments reduce bankruptcy filings from individuals whose current expenses exceed their current income.

Suggested Citation

  • Mikhed, Vyacheslav & Scholnick, Barry, 2014. "How do exogenous shocks cause bankruptcy? Balance sheet and income statement channels," Working Papers 14-17, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedpwp:14-17
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Igor Livshits & James MacGee & Michèle Tertilt, 2010. "Accounting for the Rise in Consumer Bankruptcies," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(2), pages 165-193, April.
    2. James J. Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Petra E. Todd, 1997. "Matching As An Econometric Evaluation Estimator: Evidence from Evaluating a Job Training Programme," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 64(4), pages 605-654.
    3. David B. Gross, 2002. "An Empirical Analysis of Personal Bankruptcy and Delinquency," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 15(1), pages 319-347, March.
    4. Tal Gross & Matthew J. Notowidigdo & Jialan Wang, 2014. "Liquidity Constraints and Consumer Bankruptcy: Evidence from Tax Rebates," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 96(3), pages 431-443, July.
    5. Sumit Agarwal & Chunlin Liu & Nicholas S. Souleles, 2007. "The Reaction of Consumer Spending and Debt to Tax Rebates-Evidence from Consumer Credit Data," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 115(6), pages 986-1019, December.
    6. Barry Scholnick, 2013. "Consumption Smoothing after the Final Mortgage Payment: Testing the Magnitude Hypothesis," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 95(4), pages 1444-1449, October.
    7. James J. Heckman & Hidehiko Ichimura & Petra Todd, 1998. "Matching As An Econometric Evaluation Estimator," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 65(2), pages 261-294.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Exogenous shocks; Bankruptcy;

    JEL classification:

    • D41 - Microeconomics - - Market Structure, Pricing, and Design - - - Perfect Competition
    • H31 - Public Economics - - Fiscal Policies and Behavior of Economic Agents - - - Household

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