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Education and training in an era of creative destruction

  • Leonard I. Nakamura
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    Over the course of the 20th century, the U.S. economy has moved from rote to creativity, from a mass production workforce to a white-collar workforce whose focus is developing new products for sale. In the process, economic change has been accelerated, so that our educational process and goals are increasingly inappropriate. As an example, even the intensive education of medical doctors is inadequate to the current pace of change. In this paper, the author delineates the impact of the electronic revolution that has automated routine and made creativity more profitable and therefore more powerful. The author examines the high school movement (1910-1940) and the college movement (1940-1970) as successful responses to technological challenges that increased equality. The author then attempts a tentative discussion of the electronic revolution's impact on the educational process.

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    Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia in its series Working Papers with number 00-13.

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    Date of creation: 2001
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    Handle: RePEc:fip:fedpwp:00-13
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    1. Leonard I. Nakamura, 1999. "The measurement of retail output and the retail revolution," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 32(2), pages 408-425, April.
    2. Scherer, F. M. & Harhoff, Dietmar, 2000. "Technology policy for a world of skew-distributed outcomes," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 29(4-5), pages 559-566, April.
    3. Leonard I. Nakamura, 2000. "Economics and the new economy: the invisible hand meets creative destruction," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Jul, pages 15-30.
    4. Robert E. Hall, 1999. "The Stock Market and Capital Accumulation," NBER Working Papers 7180, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Leonard I. Nakamura, 1995. "Measuring inflation in a high-tech age," Business Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia, issue Nov, pages 13-25.
    6. Dora L. Costa, 1997. "Less of a Luxury: The Rise of Recreation since 1888," NBER Working Papers 6054, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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