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COVID Response: The Primary and Secondary Corporate Credit Facilities

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Abstract

The Federal Reserve introduced the Primary Market Corporate Credit Facility (PMCCF) and the Secondary Market Corporate Credit Facility (SMCCF) in response to the severe disruptions in corporate bond markets triggered by the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent economic shutdowns. The Corporate Credit Facilities (CCFs) were designed to work together to restore functioning of credit markets, with an overarching goal of facilitating credit provision to the non-financial corporate sector of the U.S. economy. This paper provides an overview of the CCFs, including detailing the facilities’ design, documenting their operations and usage, and describing their impact on corporate bond markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Nina Boyarchenko & Caren Cox & Richard K. Crump & Andrew Danzig & Anna Kovner & Or Shachar & Patrick Steiner, 2021. "COVID Response: The Primary and Secondary Corporate Credit Facilities," Staff Reports 986, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fednsr:93083
    Note: This paper was prepared for an upcoming issue of the Economic Policy Review and a related New York Fed conference, “Implications of Federal Reserve Actions in Response to the COVID-19 Pandemic.”
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nina Boyarchenko & Anna Kovner & Or Shachar, 2020. "It’s What You Say and What You Buy: A Holistic Evaluation of the Corporate Credit Facilities," Staff Reports 935, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    2. Zhiguo He & Wei Xiong, 2012. "Rollover Risk and Credit Risk," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 67(2), pages 391-430, April.
    3. Jaewon Choi & Or Shachar & Sean Seunghun Shin, 2019. "Dealer Liquidity Provision and the Breakdown of the Law of One Price: Evidence from the CDS–Bond Basis," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 65(9), pages 4100-4122, September.
    4. Acharya, Viral V. & Engle III, Robert F & Steffen, Sascha, 2021. "Why did bank stocks crash during COVID-19?," CEPR Discussion Papers 15901, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Nina Boyarchenko & Richard K. Crump & Anna Kovner & Or Shachar, 2021. "Measuring Corporate Bond Market Dislocations," Staff Reports 957, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    6. Nina Boyarchenko & Richard K. Crump & Anna Kovner & Or Shachar & Peter Van Tassel, 2020. "The Primary and Secondary Market Corporate Credit Facilities," Liberty Street Economics 20200526a, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
    7. O'Hara, Maureen & Zhou, Xing (Alex), 2021. "Anatomy of a liquidity crisis: Corporate bonds in the COVID-19 crisis," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 142(1), pages 46-68.
    8. Ali Hortaçsu & Gregor Matvos & Chad Syverson & Sriram Venkataraman, 2013. "Indirect Costs of Financial Distress in Durable Goods Industries: The Case of Auto Manufacturers," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 26(5), pages 1248-1290.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Federal Reserve; corporate bond markets; corporate credit facilities; PMCCF; SMCCF; Federal Reserve lending facilities;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G12 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Asset Pricing; Trading Volume; Bond Interest Rates
    • G18 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Government Policy and Regulation
    • G19 - Financial Economics - - General Financial Markets - - - Other

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