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Amenities, local conditions and fiscal determinants of factor growth in rural America

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  • Eric C. Thompson
  • George Hammond
  • Stephan Weiler

Abstract

This paper examines how amenities, asset indicators, and fiscal factors influence the growth in factors of production from 1972 to 1999 in the 466 non-metropolitan labor market areas in the continental United States. In developing our model of non-metropolitan factor markets, we combine the emphasis of Brown et al. (2003) on the affect of taxes and public expenditure policy on labor and capital formation with the emphasis of Beeson et al. (2001) on the importance of climate and natural features on localized population growth. We develop our own measure of capital stock in non-metropolitan areas using data from the Census of Manufacturing for 1967, 1972, 1977, 1982, 1987, and 1992. Results indicate that local taxes discourage both employment growth and manufacturing capital formation, but that local public infrastructure investment and the level of local entrepreneurship encourages employment growth. Amenities such as a favorable climate and the presence of surface water encourage the growth of employment, and greater local wealth, as measured by dividend, interest, and rent income, encourages the formation of manufacturing capital stock. Results fail to support an “export base” approach for rural economies where greater manufacturing capital stock encourages greater employment in a region.

Suggested Citation

  • Eric C. Thompson & George Hammond & Stephan Weiler, 2006. "Amenities, local conditions and fiscal determinants of factor growth in rural America," Research Working Paper RWP 06-08, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedkrw:rwp06-08
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Glaeser, Edward L. & Scheinkman, JoseA. & Shleifer, Andrei, 1995. "Economic growth in a cross-section of cities," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 117-143, August.
    2. Alicia H. Munnell, 1990. "Why has productivity growth declined? Productivity and public investment," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Jan, pages 3-22.
    3. repec:hoo:wpaper:e-95-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Chandra, Amitabh & Thompson, Eric, 2000. "Does public infrastructure affect economic activity?: Evidence from the rural interstate highway system," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 457-490, July.
    5. Brown, Stephen P. A. & Hayes, Kathy J. & Taylor, Lori L., 2003. "State and Local Policy, Factor Markets, and Regional Growth," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 33(1), pages 40-60.
    6. Stephan Weiler, 2004. "Racing toward new frontiers : helping regions compete in the global marketplace," Main Street Economist, Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, issue Mar.
    7. Thomas J. Holmes, 1998. "The Effect of State Policies on the Location of Manufacturing: Evidence from State Borders," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(4), pages 667-705, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Guangqing Chi & David Marcouiller, 2013. "Natural amenities and their effects on migration along the urban–rural continuum," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 50(3), pages 861-883, June.
    2. Mark D. Partridge & Dan S. Rickman & Kamar Ali & M. Rose Olfert, 2008. "The Geographic Diversity of U.S. Nonmetropolitan Growth Dynamics: A Geographically Weighted Regression Approach," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 84(2), pages 241-266.
    3. David Marcouiller, 2013. "The rural development attributes of tourism," Chapters,in: Handbook of Rural Development, chapter 9, pages i-ii Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Chi, Guangqing & Marcouiller, David W., 2012. "Recreational Homes and Migration to Remote Amenity-Rich Areas," Journal of Regional Analysis and Policy, Mid-Continent Regional Science Association, vol. 42(1).
    5. Guangqing Chi & David Marcouiller, 2011. "Isolating the Effect of Natural Amenities on Population Change at the Local Level," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(4), pages 491-505.

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    Keywords

    Rural areas ; Rural development;

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